Posts Tagged ‘Georges Boillot’

(B King)

Known as ‘The Giant of Provence’, this 1900 metre mountain dominates southern Provence; its bald, treeless, summit gives it the appearance of being snow covered.

It will be familiar to those who watch ‘Le Tour de France’ (and who doesn’t?) as a particularly gruelling hill climb, but few will be aware that it is also famous as a car and motorcycle hill climbing venue.

This short review was prompted when Mark Bisset spotted the featured photograph of George Boillot in my collection. Boillot, driving a Peugeot Lion, achieved FTD in 1910; this photograph shows him near the summit on a 7.6-litre, DOHC, 16-valve, four-cylinder Peugeot L76 on August 11, 1912. His time in 1910 was 21 min 30.4, in 1912 17 min 46 sec, and in 1913, again on Peugeot, he ascended in 17 min 38 sec.

Note the W-registration, a factory trade plate. No-doubt George and his compatriots had driven the car 600 kilometres from the Lion Peugeot factory in Sochaux to the Mount.

Boillot and passenger in 1912, lack of L76 front brakes doubtless added to the challenge! (unattributed)
Ettore and passenger aboard his 5-litre chain drive Type 16 (B King)

Ettore Bugatti also competed on one of his Type 16 5-litre, SOHC, three-valve, four-cylinder machines; his journey from Molsheim would have been 750 kilometres.

Note the luggage rack on which he mounted his suitcase for the journey from Molsheim! C/n 471 still exists…as does the suitcase.

Bugatti and passenger aboard T16 at Mont Ventoux. This view is perhaps not the racer’s best angle (unattributed)

The hillclimb dates back to 1902 and the “Palmares Autos” is decorated with many famous names – to mention just a few: Rougier, Boillot of course, Thomas, Divo, Carraciola, Straight, Von Stuck, Trintignant, Behra, Barth, Hermann, Stommelen and Mitter – a veritable ‘Who’s Who’ of Grand Prix and Hill Climbing talent.

With no safety barriers and a winning average speed of almost 150 kph there were no more open events after 1976, presumably for safety reasons.

Etcetera…

Boillot, Peugeot again, year uncertain, advice welcome (B King)

Credits…

Bob King Collection

Tailpiece…

In 2002 an event was held to commemorate 100 years since the first event. My wife and I were lucky enough to chance on this celebration as we were holidaying in the region.

And what an event with over 250 racing cars and motorcycles with everything from a 1902 Paris-Vienna Renault, through scads of barely known French voiturettes (D’Yrsan, BNC, Darmont, Rally and so on), to a Porsche 906 Carrera 6 that competed in 1967, and an Abarth SP 2000 which was the European hill climb champion in 1970. What a feast for eye and ear!

The French even manage to make their brochure ads cool rather than gauche!

Finito…

engine blue

(Automobile Year #10)

‘One of the most classic racing engines of all time-and unquestionably the most widely copied-was the 1913 3 Litre 4 cylinder Peugeot conceived jointly by Georges Boillot, Jules Goux and Paolo Zuccarelli whose ideas were interpreted by the brilliant draftsman Ernest Henry’ ; Harry Mundy in Automobile Year #10…

The team first expounded the advantages of twin overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder and compact combustion chambers.

goux

Jules Goux 4th and Robert Peugeot at the 1914 French GP. Goux winner at Indy in 1913  in a Peugeot L56. Mercedes Christian Lautenschlager won the race, Boillot was well in the lead before a spate of Dunlop tyre problems. 4 July 1914, less than a week after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and the imminent start of WW1  (unattributed)

‘The Three Charlatans’; driver/technicians Goux, Boillot and Zuccarelli, the latter the most important in terms of his conceptual ideas, as they became known within Peugeot HQ, put a proposal to M Robert Peugeot to develop, outside the factory a team of cars for the 1912 French GP. The race was being revived that year, and two 3 litre cars for the Coup l’Auto at a cost of 4000 pounds for each car.

The 1912 GP engine of 7602cc was estimated to develop 140bhp@2200rpm, the car very successful as covered in the contemporary magazine articles included at the end of this piece.

‘Overhead camshafts had been used earlier by Mercedes and Clement-Bayard…The technical contribution of the Peugeot engine was in the use of the hemispherical combustion chamber, four valves per cylinder operated directly by twin overhead camshafts and a central sparking plug. In other words, Zuccarelli, from whom this conception emanated, appreciated the virtues of a compact combustion chamber, large effective valve area and low valve stresses’.

‘A stirrup-type valve tappet guided top and bottom ad having its own return spring was used and the entire mechanism was fully enclosed and lubricated; the valves and springs were exposed to assist cooling…The one piece cylinder block and head was bolted to a two piece crankcase split on the horizontal centre line of the five main bearings’ said Mundy.

Boillot won the 1912 French GP at Dieppe by 13 minutes from the closest Fiat at an average speed of 68.5 mph. The Fiats, to demonstrate the efficiency of the Peugeot engine were of 14,143cc.

coup auto

Georges Boillot, Peugeot L3, Coup l’Auto 1913 (Getty Images)

The 3 litre Peugeot engine produced for the 1913 Coupe de l’Auto race run concurrently with the French GP, was the more important in its technical influence as its efficiency and light chassis was more than a match for the 1912/13 GP cars built for an unlimited formula and having in some cases twice the capacity.

Many features of the 3 litre were common with its bigger brother but other key elements copiously copied were;

.A train of spur gears contained in a separate and easily detachable casing which replaced the former bevel gear and shaft drive to the camshafts

.The heavy stirrup type of valve tappet was discarded in favour of a finger interposed between the cam and valve stem

boillot french

Boillot on the way to Peugeot L3 victory on the Amiens 31.6 Km road course used only once for the French GP, in 1913. Zuccarelli was killed when he hit a cart before the race, 5 fatalities at the place in 2 months (unattributed)

.A novel construction was introduced for the crankcase and the 3 main bearing crank. The latter was made in two halves and bolted at the centre, at which point a double row ball bearing was used; a single row roller bearing was used for the front and rear mains. This type of construction permitted the use of a  one-piece crankcase casting, the two end bearings for the crankshaft being contained in a separate housing.

hnery

Ernest Henry at his drawing board, year unknown. Hiss exact contribution to the design of the Peugeot’s and the engine still the subject of debate after 100 years; a key member of the team whichever way you cut it (unattributed)

.It was also the first engine to use dry-sump lubrication; better cooling with full pressurisation to all bearings and also allowing engines to be placed lower in the chassis.

The influence of the engine was also profound in the sense that it lead to the adoption of a capacity limitation from 1914, a principle adopted for most subsequent formulae. From 1914 onwards there was no effective alternative to the overhead camshaft as stroke to bore ratios were reduced and rotational speeds increased, two basic requirements of increased performance…

challatans

‘The Three Charlatans’ circa 1912; Paolo Zuccarelli, Jules Goux and Georges Boillot (TNF)

Contemporary ‘The Automobile’ articles on the 1912/1913 Peugeots…

1912 L76 7.6 Litre.

4 pug 1

4 pug 2

4 pug 3

4 pug 4

1913 L3 3 Litre.

3 litre 1

3 litre 2

Bibliography and Credits…

Autonobile Year #10 artice by Harry Mundy on Grand Prix engines, ‘The Automobile’ 26 September 1912 and February 1914 articles via theoldmotor.com, The Nostalgia Forum Peugeot GP thread, Jacques Henri-Lartigue

Tailpiece: Boillot, winner on Peugeot L3. French GP, Amiens 12 July 1913…

boillot 2

(Jacques-Henri Lartigue)