Archive for May, 2016

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The ever innovative Derek Gardner with an ‘aero-tweak’ being tested on Francois Cevert’s Tyrrell 002 Ford during Italian GP practice at Monza on 10 September 1972…

This huge sleeve over the exhausts is cowled from the oil coolers back, the idea being to harness the exhaust gas energy to entrain air through the sleeve and enhance airflow and hence better cooling thru the oil rads.

Francois hadn’t done too many laps when the ‘prophylactics’ parted company with the car at very high speed, bouncing their way into lightweight schrapnel around the famous autodrome, fortunately ‘002’ was well clear of any following cars at the time!

The shot below shows a standard ‘006’ rear end to give an idea of how the car appeared sans ducts. Ken Tyrrell and Jackie Stewart discuss the sublime weather before Francois is sent on his way. These cars evolved a lot throughout 1972/3, the Tyrrells arguably (Lotus 72 pace duly noted!) the quickest cars of the era from the time ‘001’ first raced at Oulton Park later in 1970 until Stewart’s retirement and Cevert’s death at Watkins Glen at the end of 1973.

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Date and place unknown, 1973 Tyrrell 006 Ford, Cevert up (unattributed)

Monza ’72 wasn’t a good race for the ‘Boys in Blue’ at all though, JYS popped a clutch on the line and was lucky not to get ‘whacked up the clacker’ at a million miles an hour and Francois’ engine ‘popped’ on lap 14. Emerson Fittipaldi took the race and the ’72 title in his Lotus 72D Ford.

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FC looking very ‘chillaxed’ prior to the ’73 British GP at Silverstone, Tyrrell 006 Ford (unattributed)

You might find this story about Cevert’s early career of interest if you haven’t already seen it;

https://primotipo.com/2014/11/07/francois-cevert-formative-years/

I wrote an article a while back about Team Tyrrell and innovation, have a read of it if you haven’t. Its amazing just how ‘edgy’ Ken’s boys were over the years given their resources relative to bigger, better funded teams;

https://primotipo.com/2014/09/16/tyrrell-019-ford-1990-and-tyrrell-innovation/

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Roll on into mid-1973 and Derek was considering his overall design and aero alternatives for his 1974 car…

Here Francois is testing ‘005’ during British GP practice at Silverstone in mid July, JYS did a few laps in the same car carrying #42. It looks remarkably cohesive for a car designed originally with a totally different bluff nose aerodynamic concept!

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Compare and contrast the ‘normal’ bluff nose Tyrrell ‘006’ Cevert races here in front of James Hunt’s March 731 Ford at the British GP, Silverstone in 1973, with the ‘005’ chisel nose he tested in practice above. Hunt was a splendid 4th, Cevert 5th, Revson took his first GP win in a McLaren M23 Ford (unattributed)

It was a good year until the USGP, JYS took his third title in the ‘low polar moment of inertia’, short wheelbase, twitchy but very quick in both Stewart and Cevert’s hands, Tyrrell 005/006 cars.

Click on this link for a short story about those cars;

https://primotipo.com/2014/08/25/jackie-stewart-monaco-gp-1973-tyrrell-006-ford/

Gardner had a pretty handy additional test pilot in Chris Amon who was contracted the drive the spare Tyrrell 005 in the end of season North American GP’s at Mosport and Watkins Glen. Chris was always rated as a test-driver by all he raced with from Ferrari’s Mauro Forghieri ‘down’.

Amon raced 005 in side radiator/chisel nose spec in Canada, he didn’t race it at Watkins Glen after Francois’ fatal accident on the Saturday resulted in Ken Tyrrell withdrawing the teams cars for the race, which would have been the retiring Stewart’s 100th GP.

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Chris Amon 10th in Tyrrell 005 Ford in the Canadian GP, Chris has ‘modified’ the cars nose during the race. JYS was 5th in 006, Cevert DNF after a collision with Scheckter, Peter Revson won the race in a McLaren M23 Ford (unattributed)

Derek Gardner tested the ‘chisel nose, side radiator’ aerodynamic approach pioneered by the Lotus 56 at Indianapolis in 1968.

After the history making changes at the 1973 seasons end Derek Gardner threw out the conceptual approach he had decided upon for 1974. The car was to be a ‘highly strung thoroughbred’ from which maestro’s Stewart and Cevert could extract every ounce of performance. His change was to a much more forgiving chassis attuned to the developmental needs of ‘cub drivers’ Jody Scheckter and Patrick Depailler for 1974, his ‘007’ design the very effective result.

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Tyrrell 007 Ford cutaway; aluminium monocoque chassis, Ford Cosworth 3 litre DFV V8, Hewland FG400 5 speed transaxle, disc brakes inboard front and rear, wishbone front suspension with coil spring dampers, rear suspension by single upper link, lower parallel links, radius rods and coil spring/damper units, adjustable roll bars (unattributed)

Tailpiece: The ’74 Tyrrell 007 Ford in Depailler’s hands, Swedish GP in which he was 2nd and Scheckter’s 1st, winning the South African’s  first GP. Evolution of Derek Gardner’s aero thinking clear from ’73-’74, mind you he went back to a bluff nose for his outrageous P34 6 wheeler for 1976…

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(unattributed)

Credits…

Rainer Schlegelmilch, Doug Nye ‘History of The GP Car’

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# 1 Senna, then Brundle, not sure in the white/red helmet, #9 Eric Lang, #4 Calvin Fish all Ralt RT3/83, first lap British GP F3 race 16 July 1983 (Schlegelmilch)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ayrton Senna has Martin Brundle right ‘up his clacker’ during the 1983 British GP F3 support race at Silverstone, Ralt RT3 Toyota’s both. Senna prevailed by a second over 20 laps, 16 July 1983…

And so it was for the season; Senna’s ‘West Surrey Racing’ entry took 12 wins and the title from Martin’s ‘Eddie Jordan Racing’ 6 wins but Brundle came ‘home like a train’ winning three of the last four rounds and setting up a thrilling last round confrontation, won by Senna at Silverstone on 23 October. Both drivers used the dominant Toyota 2T-G powered Ralt RT3/83, the car updated from the prior year in terms of sidepods and suspension geometry.

Both drivers jumped into Grand Prix racing in 1984; Senna with Toleman and Brundle with Tyrrell.

Credits…

Rainer Schlegelmilch, David Lister, oldracingcars.com

Tailpiece…

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Senna #1 and Brundle on the front row of the 1983 British GP F3 support race. Ralt RT3/83 Toyota (Lister)

 

 

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Austin Miller’s Cooper T51 Climax chases Bib Stillwell’s similar car at Reid Park gates, Mount Panorama, Bathurst on 2 October 1960, magic John Ellacott shot…

The two drivers are contesting the ‘Craven A International’ won by Jack Brabham from Bill Patterson, and Stillwell in 2.5/2.4 and 2.2 litre Cooper T51’s respectively. Miller retired his 2.2 litre engined car during the 26 lap race. Note the beautiful bucolic Bathurst surrounds of apple orchards and grazing paddocks, is a dangerous place, especially then, these cars mighty quick.

Jack was in the process of winning the 1960 GP championships for himself and Cooper, returning to Oz between the Italian GP at Monza on 4 September and season-ending USGP at Riverside on 20 November. He won the title with 5 wins from teammate Bruce McLaren and Stirling Moss (Lotus 18 Climax). Jack and Bruce drove ‘Lowline’ Cooper T53’s that season.

The tyre marks are from Doug Whiteford’s Maser 300S which had a component faiure earlier in the meeting.

The Gold Star title for Australia’s champion driver that year was won by Alec Mildren in another T51 but interestingly powered by a 2.5 litre Maser 250S ‘Birdcage’ engine.

I’ve already written an article or two about Stillwell.

https://primotipo.com/2015/03/10/bib-stillwell-cooper-t49-monaco-warwick-farm-sydney-december-1961/

https://primotipo.com/2015/09/22/aston-martin-db4gt-zagato-2vev-lex-davison-and-bib-stillwell/

Businessman, crop-duster pilot, publican, racer and Australian Land Speed Record Holder ‘Aussie’ Miller is an intensely interesting character, article coming soon! I know his son Guy having raced against him in FF and his engineer Geoff Smedley has helped with another article, must call ’em!

The shot below is also at Bathurst, its Austin heading across the top of the ‘mount. ‘Superior Cars’ signage is one of Stan Jones Melbourne dealerships.

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(John Ellacott)

Credits…

John Ellacott

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The 1937 Avus-Rennen is one of ‘those races meetings’ I suspect most of us would have rather liked to attend, these photos are of Hermann Lang’s Mercedes W25 during testing the week before on 22 May 1937…

His car is a 1936 speed record chassis rebuilt with a long wheelbase and the ‘standard’ 5.7 litre straight-8 fitted to the W125 GP cars that season.

The ‘final’ race of the meeting was the fastest race ever until the Monza 500 in 1958, Rosemeyer’s Auto Union fastest practice lap, 176.7mph and the fastest race lap, in two of the heats 171.74mph by Rosemeyer and Lang!

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Hermann Lang testing his Mercedes W25 modified 1936 speed record car the week before the 1937 race (ullstein bild)

The Germans didn’t race at Avus during 1936, they were rebuilding Berlins fastest circuit in the world into something even quicker with the addition of the ‘Nordschleife’ and massive ‘wall of death’ banking at 44 degrees. Avus was built in 1921 and used for racing until 1998 when it was absorbed fully into Germany’s road network as autobahn # 115.

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Rosemeyer and friends AU Type C (Max Ehlert)

The 1937 race was a Formula Libre event which 300000-400000 spectators attended, what a spectacle it must have been. Such was the level of national prestige involved the German teams went all out to win building special cars and testing them in three sessions before the meeting itself.

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Rosemeyer on the Avus banking, Auto Union Type C Streamliner, Hasse or von Delius in AU C Type then Seaman W125 (Ullstein Bild)

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AU’s were all Type C V16’s, 2 streamliners (Rosemeyer and Fagioli) and 2 open wheelers (von Delius and Hasse)

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Non German cars also rans! Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Tipo 12C-36 of Nuvolari, Brivio and Farina withdrawn before the race

Because of concerns about tyre life, such was the weight, speed of the cars and tyre technology of the day, the 30 May event was split into 2 heats of 7 laps and a final of 8 laps comprising the first 4 placegetters from each heat.

The heats were won by Rudy Caracciola and Manfred von Brauchitsch in ‘Benz W125 and W25K-DAB(5.6V12) respectively, the final by Hermann Lang’s Mercedes W25K-M125. All these cars were ‘Stromlinien’ (Streamliners), single-seaters with all-enveloping bodywork.

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Caracciola this side in Mercedes W125 and Rosemeyer Auto Union Type C (Ullstein Bild)

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Rosemeyer #31 and von Delius AU Type C’s

Kolumbus.f1 has a well researched, detailed account of this meeting, click here to read it, just scroll down the page, there are a couple of other events before you get to Avus;

http://www.kolumbus.fi/leif.snellman/gp372.htm

During practice for the meeting Lang’s car, with wheel covers fitted was doing 390kmh when trapped air under the car ‘lifted the front wheels from the ground, luckily the driver kept calm and finally managed to bring the wheels back down’…the wheel covers were removed for the race!

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Tyre technician checks out the Continental ‘slick’, big challenge keeping tyres up to these big, heavy, powerful cars. Lang’s car as per text (Ullstein Bild)

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von Delius 6 litre V16 being gently warmed up, what awesome cars

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Hermann Lang’s winning Benz W25K

Down the decades the role of ‘aerodynamic guinea pig’ has not always been conducive to drivers attainment of retirement age, Bernd Rosemeyer’s fatal Auto Union speed record attempt on 28 January 1938 an ‘in period’ case in point…

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Caracciola’s W125 Benz, Avus 1937 (Ullstein Bild)

Checkout this Avus ’37 Footage…

Etcetera…

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Caratch during testing, Northcurve Benz W125 (ullstein bild)

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Fagioli’s AU Streamliner Type C

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Love this shot for the contrast between Langs leading Streamliner W25 ahead o Dick Seaman’s openwheeler W125 ‘normal’ GP car

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Avus, Fagioli Auto Union during practice 27 May 1937 (Imagno)

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von Brauchisch’ big Benz 1936 W25 with 700bhp DAB V12 and Lang 1936 LWB speed record W25 5.7 litre Straight-8 ahead of one of von Delius or Hasse AU Type C open-wheeler 6 litre V16 (Heritage Images)

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Caratch and arch-rival Bernd, Avus ’37 (ullstein bild)

Credits…

All images not attributed by Ullstein Bild, Heinrich Hoffman, Imagno, Max Ehlert, Heritage Images, Kolumbus F1

Tailpiece: Stromlinien on display, place undisclosed 1937, am interested to know if any of you can pick the venue…

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(Heinrich Hoffman)

 

 

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Image from a 1939 promotional brochure to sell the car, not much has changed in the positioning of luxury high performance cars over the years, it’s just that online media is more important than print…

I’ve no idea what the seaplane is but am intrigued to know if any of you aircraft enthusiasts can pick it.

406 of these cars were built between 1934 and 1940. Powered by a 5.4 litre supercharged, 180bhp straight-eight, these elegant 2600Kg beasts topped 105mph and did a standing quarter in around 16.5 seconds.

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The car above is the ‘ducks guts’ 540K Spezial Roadster of which only 25 were built, the brand association with the Hindenburg LZ-129 airship ended up rather a sub-optimal choice!

Credit…

Heritage Images, unattributed

Tailpiece…

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John Surtees races his North American Racing Team Ferrari 158 to second place at Watkins Glen on October 4, keeping alive his ultimately successful 1964 title chances…

Enzo Ferrari was in a spat with the Italian governing body at the time over its refusal, Ferrari having failed to build the minimum number of cars, to homologate the sports/racer Ferrari 250LM as a Sportscar. The result of which forced entrants to race it as a Prototype, a category in which it was not competitive and not designed for; putting aside the lucky, outright 250LM Le Mans win for Masten Gregory and Jochen Rindt in 1965!

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Test session for the Ferrari 158’s, one of which is in NART colors, on 15 September 1964. John Surtees in drivers overalls, Technical Director Mauro Forghieri to his left, mechanic Giulio Borsari in the white cap. Modena Autodrome (GP Photo)

Not that the Italian autocrat was going to let principle, as he saw it, get in the way of practicality. There were Grand Prix World Championships to win so rather than race in traditional racing red he ‘relinquished his entrants licence’, the cars, works cars in every way, shape and form being entered by Ferrari’s concessionaire in the US, Luigi Chinetti’s N.A.R.T at both the final two 1964 championship rounds at Watkins Glen, New York State and in Mexico City.

Surtees 2nd placings in both races gave him the Drivers title and Ferrari the Manufacturers from Graham Hill’s BRM P261 by 9 points.

‘Honour’ and title won the Ferrari’s raced on in Italian Racing Red and the 250LM as a prototype, much to its private entrants chagrin…

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Surtees ready for the off, Modena 15 September 1964 (GP Photo)

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Photo Credits…

For all shots ‘Grand Prix Photo’

Tailpiece: Camper’s delight as Surtees Fazz speeds past, Watkins Glen ’64…

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(unattributed)

 

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Somehow I think the local boyos aren’t getting excited about the rear of Andre Hechard’s D.B-Panhard HBR?…

This shot was taken in Brescia during the 1956 Mille Miglia which was won by Eugenio Castellotti’s Ferrari 290MM Scaglietti . Hechard’s Sports 750 class car DNF, no details of the lady sadly…

Credit…

Carlo Bavagnoli

(more…)

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Jackie Stewart’s BRM P261 is pushed onto the Longford grid by Jimmy Collins and Stan Collier on 5 March 1966…

The race is the ‘Launceston Examiner Trophy’, the preliminary Longford Tasman round race, Jackie is being pushed into ‘pole’. Jackie won the main race, the ‘South Pacific Trophy’ on the Saturday from his teammate Graham Hill and Jack’s Brabham BT19 Repco, the new ‘620 Series’ V8, 2.5 litres in Tasman spec having its third race gearing up for his successful world championship assault that year.

For the BRM boys it would be a more character building year, mind you, Jackie took a great Monaco GP win in his nimble 2.1 litre P261 against the new 3 litre GP cars…

Credits…

Spencer Lambert, Doug Nye, Ray Bell, Tasmanian Motorist Magazine

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Deacon Litz lines up his Maser V8 RI for practice prior to the 1937 George Vanderbilt Cup at Roosevelt Raceway, Long Island, New York on 5 July 1937…

All four of these 4788cc, supercharged 320bhp V8 racers ended up in the US having proved totally uncompetitive against the Mercedes Benz W25 and Auto Union V16 challenge in 1935/6.

This car chassis ‘4501’ practiced but didnt’t start the Vanderbilt Cup, at that stage it was owned by the Bradley-Martin brothers who owned horse racing stables under the name ‘Balmacaan’, it was in this name the car was entered.

The Mercedes, Auto Unions and latest Alfa’s weren’t available ex-factory so the latest Masers on paper were appealing but in reality second-hand Bugatti Type 59 or various Alfa’s would have been better bets.

‘4501’ remained in the ‘States, failing to qualify for the Indy 500 on every occasion it fronted up; in 1939, 1946, 1947, 1948 and 1949 finally being ‘pensioned off’ at this point for SCCA racing…

Credit…

Archive Photos

Tailpiece: Philippe Etancelin winning the 1935 Pau GP in a Maser V8 RI…

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