Archive for the ‘Fotos’ Category

Graham Hill testing a BRM P57 Coventry Climax at Snetterton in 1961…

The Getty Images caption lists the date of the photograph as 1 January 1961 which seems a bit unlikely as Hill was with the rest of the BRM team aboard a de Havilland Comet enroute to New Zealand to contest the NZ GP at Ardmore before the P48’s raced by Hill and Dan Gurney were then shipped to Australia for races at Warwick Farm and Ballarat Airfield.

But the jist of the photograph seems to be an early test of the new ‘61 car attended by the BBC who have Graham ‘all wired up’.

1961 was an ‘interim’ season for all of the British F1 teams as none of them had their (BRM and Coventry Climax) V8’s ready for the new 1.5 GP formula which commenced that January.

As a consequence, the Coventry Climax four cylinder 1.5 litre FPF F2 engine- introduced in 1957, was pressed into service by Cooper, Lotus and BRM as an interim solution pending arrival of the Climax and BRM new bent-eights.

It was one of few occasions when the Bourne marque used engines manufactured by folks other than themselves- other exceptions which spring to mind are the Rover gas turbine engine which went into the early sixties Le Mans prototype contender and the Chev V8’s fitted to the dawn of the seventies Can-Am cars.

The shot above is Graham in the Monza pitlane in September with the exhaust side of his FPF peeking at us from beneath its engine cover.

Car #26 behind is the nose of Tony Brooks’ machine, he was fifth in the other BRM in the tragic race which cost Ferrari’s ‘Taffy’ Von Trips and fourteen spectators their lives after a collision involving Von Trips and Jim Clark, Lotus 21 Climax, in the early laps. Hill G retired with engine failure whilst Hill P won the race and the drivers championship in a Ferrari 156.

Graham is above with BBC technicians at left and consulting with Chief Engineer Tony Rudd at right, the clothing rather suggests it’s early in the year- a very long one given the pace of the squadron of Ferrari 156’s. Best results for the P57 were Tony Brooks’ fifth and third places at Monza and Watkins Glen and Graham Hill’s sixth in France and fifth in the US.

First lap, Monaco 1961. Ginther, Ferrari 156 leads from Moss and Clark in Lotus 18 and 21 Climax. Then its Tony Brooks #16 BRM P48/57 with Phil Hill’s #38 Ferrari 156 inside Brooks and almost unsighted is Graham Hill’s BRM P57. The silver nose is Gurney’s Porsche 718 and the other splotch of red Von Trips 156. Moss won from Ginther, Hill and Trips. What a picture!

In non-championship events, even with the Ferraris absent, it was still tough, Hill’s second in the Glover Trophy at Goodwood and third in the Aintree 200 were promising whilst Brook’s best was third in the Brands Hatch Silver City Trophy event later in the season.

(B Cahier)

Mind you BRM were about to enter their purple patch.

Rudd’s ‘Stackpipe’ 1962 BRM P578’s powered by the P56 V8 made the team a force, together with the P261 monocoques which followed for the balance of the 1.5 litre formula- dual World Titles for BRM and Hill followed in 1962 of course.

The shot above is of Graham in the Zandvoort dunes in May 1962, he was first on that day from Trevor Taylor’s Lotus 24 Climax and Phil Hill’s Ferrari 156.

Hill’s P261 at Monza in 1964 has this utterly luvverly, later P60 version of the P56/60 family of engines, the capacity of which stretched from 1.5 to 2.1 litres, at that latter size the P261’s were still race winners in the Tasman Series as late as 1967 against cars with engines of 2.5 litres.

Hill below at Monza in 1964- look at the number of punters in that pitlane! Chaos.

His P261 was fitted with the P60 V8 shown above. Whilst Graham qualified well in third slot his race was over before it started with clutch failure on the line- John Surtees won in a Ferrari 158 enroute to his driver’s title.

Car 20 is Richie Ginther’s P261 which was fourth, and car 36 in front is ‘Geki’ Russo’s Brabham BT11 BRM which failed to qualify.

Credits…

Getty Images, Bernard Cahier, ‘BRM 2’ Doug Nye

Tailpiece: Hill, BRM P57, Snetterton 1961…

Pretty little car, the spaceframe chassis was made of 1 1/2 and 1 1/4 inch outside diameter Accles and Pollock 4CM steel tube- three P57 Climax chassis were built.

Doug Nye notes that whilst the three P57 Climaxes built in 1961 looked proportionately neat and handsome they were built around the P48’s bag fuel tanks which left them still too big- the 1.5 litre engines would consume far less fuel than their 2.5 litre predecessors- 24 gallons compared with 35 gallons, so the mandated use (by Peter Berthon) of the two main moulded FPT tanks ‘restricted potential for serious slimming down’ Nye wrote. The similarly engined Lotus 21 by way of comparison was far lighter being built to the minimum weight limit of 450 kg whereas the BRM was 70 kg above that.

The best of the seven Climax 1.5 FPF’s BRM used in 1961, a Mark 2 specification engine, ‘1224’ gave about 153 bhp @ 7000 rpm. The P57’s gearbox was the P27 transaxle left over from the 2.5 litre P48 program but with an additional fifth gear fitted into the case. Whilst strong, no doubt the ‘boxes were heavy.

Finito…

 

Touring Car and Sportscar tustle at Longford in 1965…

Don Gorringe, John Goss, Bob Curran and Greg Ellis blast over the River Esk- they have just completed the fast left-hander onto Long Bridge.

These blokes are all Tasmanian’s- I think it’s probably one of the locals only races, Gossy learned his trade pretty well down south- the only fella to win the Australian GP and Bathurst 1000 race double of course.

Goss is in an Appendix J Holden FJ, in front Gorringe is aboard a Jaguar XK150- which is clearly the successful businessman’s ‘daily driver’ given the rego plate affixed to the front bumper. Bob Curran’s Triumph TR4 was a machine he raced through to 1970 at least and the last car is Ellis’ MGA, it too appears as though he raced it for quite a bit.

Do any of these cars still exist? Who won the race?

Love this David Keep photo, it’s very much a ‘feel the noise’ shot…

Credit…

oldracephotos.com.au/D Keep

John Surtees, the reigning World F1 Champ, aboard his Cooper T75 BRM P80 during the ‘London Trophy’ weeekend at Crystal Palace in June 1965…

He was a busy boy that year, fitting in F2 races around his primary programs for Ferrari in F1 and Endurance events.

Ken Tyrrell entered two Coopers that weekend, the other for Jackie Stewart, above, very much on his career ascent- he scored his first GP win with BRM that season at Monza in September aboard a P261 after a great dice with his teammate Graham Hill.

Surtees, Cooper T75 BRM

The London Trophy comprised two heats of 25 laps, the top four in each race were the same, Jim Clark, Lotus 35 Cosworth SCA, Graham Hill, Brabham BT16 BRM, Richard Attwood, Lola T60 SCA and Jochen Rindt, Brabham BT16 SCA.

(Getty)

The off, Heat 1.

Stewart at left and Clark right, Brabham on the inside of row 2.

Clark won both heats, the Tyrrell Coopers had problems in this heat which were fatal for their chances of a start in the second race- Stewart had half-shaft failure after completing 16 laps and a rod let go in the BRM engine after 21 of the 25 laps in Surtees case.

There was plenty of depth on the grid, other starters included Mike Spence, Trevor Taylor, Chris Amon, Denny Hulme, Jack Brabham and Peter Revson with the DNQ list including Jo Siffert, David Hobbs and Chris Irwin.

Credits

Getty Images

Tailpiece: Jim Clark, Lotus 35…

Jim Clark aboard his Lotus 35 SCA, final chat to his mechanic who has a tyre pressure gauge at the ready. I’m not sure this is Crystal Palace, if it is, the car behind is Bill Bradley’s Brabham BT10 SCA.

Finito…

An impressionist’s perspective of the Ferrari 126C4 or thereabouts.

I cropped it off an AGIP ad of the period, I rather like it…

These turbo-charged Ferraris were an evocative series of Gee Pee cars for those of us in Australia who saw our first F1 machines ‘in the metal’ in the early Adelaide years.

Dangerous cars, high powered, towards 900 bhp depending upon the specs, aluminium monocoque chassis early on and then carbon fibre from the 1982 Harvey Postlethwaite designed 126C2.

Alboreto off to the shops in Turin- 126C4 in 1984 (unattributed)

 

Carbon fibre and kevlar monocoque chassis, disc brakes all round, rack and pinion steering. Pull rod and twin wishbone suspension front and rear. 1496 cc DOHC, 4-valve, twin-turbo charged 120 degree V6- 660bhp @ 11000 rpm. 5 speed manual transaxle (unattributed)

Gilles Villeneuve died in one at Zolder in 1982 and Didier Pironi had a huge career ending shunt at Hockenheim six races later.

Some talented fellas raced the cars to ten wins from 1981 through 1984- the roster included Villeneuve, Pironi, Andretti, Tambay, Arnoux and Alboreto. All won at least one race except Mario who had only two starts- at Monza and Las Vegas in late 1983.

(Getty)

Patrick Tambay 126C3 montage from 1983, above, and Michele Alboreto in a C4 at Monaco in 1984 below.

Tambay took two 126 wins at Hockenheim and San Marino in 1982 and 1983 respectively, whilst Michele won at Zolder in 1984.

Credits…

AGIP, Getty Images, Paul-Henri Cahier, LAT Images

Tailpiece: Ferrari 126C4, Monaco June 1984…

Arnoux and Alboreto were third and sixth at Monaco in 1984, Alain Prost won the race in a McLaren MP4 TAG- Porsche from Ayrton Senna’s rapidly closing Toleman Hart.

Only the early red flagging of the race- because of the awful wet conditions prevented the precociously talented Brazilian taking his first F1 victory.

Prost, McLaren MP4-2 TAG Porsche from Mansell, Lotus 95T Renault early in the race- Mansell lost it on lap 16- and we saw it all from the in-car footage. Monaco in the wet with 800 bhp or thereabouts to tame (unattributed)

Factory Porsche 956 driver Jacky Ickx was the Clerk of The Course, he took the decision to red flag the race in favour of the TAG-Porsche engined McLaren, at a time the rain had eased somewhat- without recourse to the race stewards.

Mind you, it’s said that Senna’s car had damaged suspension and would not have lasted too many more laps- and then there is Stefan Bellof, Tyrrell Ford mounted who was catching them both hand over fist, he too was disqualified later for weight restrictions broken by Tyrrell…

(unattributed)

Senna, Toleman T184 Hart 415T and Bellof, Tyrrell Ford DFY with Ayrton pulling away, but Stefan surged back to third later in the race- and was threatening Senna and Prost.

Speed, drama, excitement, politics- all the elements that make GP racing great.

Finito…

(G Bruce)

Ron Tauranac’s two Brabham BT5 Lotus-Ford twin-cams’s were built in 1963…

The Ian Walker Racing ‘SC-1-63′ achieved plenty of success in the hands of both Frank Gardner and Paul Hawkins.

The car used a typical Tauranac multi-tubular spaceframe chassis with upper and lower wishbones at the front and lower links, inverted top wishbone and two radius rods- coil spring/shocks front and rear. Rack and pionion steering, disc brakes all around, a Hewland 4-speed gearbox and a Cosworth tuned Lotus-Ford Twin-Cam of 1596cc giving circa 140 bhp completed the package.

The photograph below is a BT5 test session at Goodwood early in 1963 with the Aussies out in force, oh, and a Kiwi.

From left in the nice, warm ‘jumper’ is Paul Hawkins, lanky Frank Gardner, the Guvnor and Denny Hulme. All rather handy at the wheel of a motorcar- and on the end of a ‘spanner’.

(unattributed)

Credits…

Gordon Bruce, frankgardnermotorsport.com

Tailpiece: Gardner, BT5 Ford, Mallory Park…

(FGM)

Finito…

Mark Webbers Porsche 919 looking somewhat alien-like during the June 2014 running of the Le Mans 24 Hour classic…

He shared the car with Timo Bernhard and Brendon Hartley, the trio led the race a couple of times, as late as during the twenty-first hour but a broken roll bar forced them into the pits at that point and the car was retired.

 

Ultimately the Andre Lotterer/Marcel Fassler/Benoit Treluyer Audi R18 e-tron 4 litre turbo-diesel V6 won from the similar car of Tom Kristenson/Marc Gene/Lucas di Grassi with the Toyota TS040 Hybrid 3.7 litre V8- its crew Anthony Davidson/Sebastien Buemi/Nicolas Lapierre, third.

 

The best placed Porker was in eleventh- Marc Lieb/Romain Dumas/Neel Jani aboard the 2 litre turbo-V4 919 Hybrid. Webber and Co completed 346 laps but were non-classified, the winners did 379.

 

Most of you will recall Mark Webber left Formula 1 for Endurance Racing at the end of 2013 doing three seasons with Porsche before his retirement at the end of 2016.

He won the World Endurance Drivers Championship together with Hartley and Bernhard in 2015, the trio took eight wins over the three years they raced together helping Porsche win the Manufacturers Championship In 2015 and 2016.

Getty Images is an orgy of photography, regular readers will be well aware of the value of the resource to me, do have a look- key ‘Le Mans’ into the search engine and the 62,351 images which pop up will keep you busy for a while.

This piece is visual, with a focus on the more creative of Getty’s Mark Webber 2014 ‘Lee Manz’, as Larry Perkins calls it, shots. More on the Porsche 919; https://primotipo.com/2016/02/10/testing-testing/

My posts may be a bit hap-hazard over the next three weeks, I am on safari in England and Italy for a bit.

 

Credits…

Getty Images

Tailpiece…

Finito…

French GP, Rouen 1968…

It has the feel of final practice/qualifying about it doesn’t it?

The wing in the foreground is either Jacky Ickx’ winning Ferrari 312 or Chris Amon’s sister car.

Graham Hill stands patiently at left whilst the mechanics make adjustments to his car with Lotus boss Colin Chapman leaving the boys to it, resting against the pit counter.

At far left, obscured, Jack Brabham is being tended to in his Brabham BT26 Repco ‘860’ V8- Jochen Rindt popped his BT26 on pole proving the car had heaps of speed if not reliability from its new 32 valve, DOHC V8. The speedy Austrian took two poles with it that year.

The dude in the blue helmet is Jackie Oliver who is about to have the mother and father of high speed accidents when wing support failure saw him pinging his way through the French countryside, clobbering a set of chateau gates and dispensing aluminium shrapnel liberally about the place at around 125 mph.

He survived intact – shaken but not stirred you might say. It wasn’t the last of his career ‘big ones’ either. Click here; https://primotipo.com/2017/01/13/ollies-trolley/

In the distance is Goodyear blue and white striped, jacket wearing Tyler Alexander so there must be a couple of McLaren M7A’s down that way.

Ickx won a tragic wet race in which French racer Jo Schlesser died on lap 2 when he lost control of the unsorted Honda RA302 in the fast swoops past the pits, burned alive in the upturned car it was a grisly death.

Ickx’ first GP win, no doubt it was memorable for the Belgian for all of the wrong reasons.

He won from John Surtees, below, in the conventional Honda RA301 V12 and Jackie Stewart’s Matra MS10 Ford.

Surtees did not have a great Honda season retiring in eight of the twelve GP’s- his second at Rouen and third place at Watkins Glen were the two high points of the season.

Honda withdrew from GP racing at the end of the year to return with a vengeance a decade or so hence.

Click on this article for a piece on the 1968 French GP and also the evolution of wings in that period; https://primotipo.com/2016/08/19/angle-on-the-dangle/

Credits…

Getty Images, oldracingcars.com

Tailpieces: Jo Schlesser, Honda RA302…

You would have to have a crack wouldn’t you?

The offer of a works car in your home Grand Prix, however badly your vastly experienced team leader felt about the radical magnesium chassis, 3 litre (88mm x 61.40 mm bore/stroke- 2987 cc) 120 degree air-cooled V8 machine would have been too much to resist ?

And so it was that poor, forty years old, Jo Schlesser died having a red hot go after completing only 12 Km of the race.

Denis Jenkinson looks on, above, as Schlesser prepares for the off during practice, the look on the great journalists face says everything about his interest in this new technical direction. The car behind is Richard Atwood’s seventh placed BRM P126 V12.

The air ducts here and there are clear and necessary to try to keep the engine lubricant coolish.

I’ve a feature part finished on this design so let’s not go too berserk now.

A magnesium monocoque chassis supported the unstressed, fuel injected V8 which is variously quoted at between 380 -430bhp at this early stage of its development- I am more at the conservative end of that range.

Inboard rocker front suspension and outboard at the rear, note the ‘boxed’ inboard lower inverted wishbones, single top link and two radius rods. Engine ducting again clear.

John Surtees tested another RA302 during the Italian GP weekend at Monza in September but declined to race the car, that chassis still exists.

Wouldn’t it be nice if we could see that machine at the Phillip Island Historics/Australian GP ‘double-whammy’ one March?

Finito…