Archive for the ‘Sports Racers’ Category

Jack Brabham’s first Le Mans 24 Hours was the 1957 running of the endurance classic during which he shared a Cooper T39 Climax with Englishman Ian Raby…

Whilst the Coventry Climax 1097cc FPF engined car was quick the duo finished fifteenth outright and third in their 1100cc class behind the similarly engined works Lotus 11 of the American duo Herbert Mackay-Fraser and Jay Chamberlain (ninth overall) and the Bob Walshaw/John Dalton Lotus 11 FPF (thirteenth overall).

Upfront it was a Jaguar D Type rout, the marvellous British six-cylinder beasts occupied the first four places with the Ron Flockhart/Ivor Bueb Ecurie Ecosse car at the head of the chasing pack- the new 3 litre short-stroke XK engine did the trick. Click here for an article in part about this race; https://primotipo.com/2015/01/17/le-mans-1957-d-type-jaguar-rout-ron-flockhart-racer-and-aviator/

Jack and Ian Raby with their Le Mans steed, what airport folks? (unattributed)

 

(Motorsport)

Jack has his hand up to his face, perhaps he is about to indicate to a low flying Jaguar or Ferrari that he wants the pass before the next corner.

The Cooper T39 ‘Bobtail’ was based on the Owen Maddocks’ contemporary 500cc design specifically to accept the new Coventry Climax FWA four cylinder, two valve, single overhead camshaft, twin SU fed 1100cc engine. Later the 1460cc Climax FWB was offered and still later sleeved down 1100cc versions of the 1.5 litre FPF twin-cam, two valve engine as used by Brabham and Raby here.

(Motorsport)

Here the eighth placed, first in 1500cc class, Ed Hugus/Carel de Beaufort Porsche 550A RS chases Brabham through the ever present sand banks awaiting the unwary or careless.

I’m cheating with this shot, it’s Le Mans but a year later- in 1958 Jack shared an Aston Martin DBR1/300 with Stirling Moss, never a good guy to share with at this event given his usual role as ‘the hare’.

The car, leading strongly at the time from the start was out after only 30 laps with a buggered conrod- Jack didn’t get a steer on raceday- Olivier Gendebien and Phil Hill won that year in a Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa 3 litre V12.

Shots of Jack actually in an Aston Martin DBR1/300 are thin on the ground- let’s make this one almost in…

Its Goodwood, the RAC Tourist Trophy in September 1958 in which he shared a car with Cooper teammmate Roy Salvadori to second place in the race won by Stirling Moss and Tony Brooks in a sister car with another DBR1 crewed by Carroll Shelby and Stuart Lewis-Evans in third place.

Winners are grinners, so too are finishers in this gruelling race- Ian Raby and Jack looking pretty happy and looking forward to a bath and a beer or a Beaujolais perhaps.

Etcetera…

(Motorsport)

Jack contemplates his Climax engine with plenty of support during practice whilst an artist sets to- the car passing is the #8 Lewis-Evans/Severi Ferrari 250 TR which swallowed a piston in practice and did not start. The pair raced a 315 Sport to fourth placed and as such were the best placed Ferrari and the only one of five Scuderia Ferrari entries to go the distance albeit 27 laps adrift of the winning Jag.

(Motorsport)

Brabham goes around the outside of one of the Lotus 11s early in the race. These ‘Bobtails’ started as central seat sportscars but as race organisers got a little antsy about that were also built with a seat either side of the centre of the car- as here.

(Motorsport)

Ian Raby…

Ian Raby on the hop, the Brighton garage owner/motor trader died after an accident in an F2 Brabham BT14 Ford Twin-cam at Zandvoort in 1967.

Raby is the type of bloke I admire- a racer to his core, he started in a Cooper Mk2 or Mk4 JAP as ‘chief cook and bottle washer’- driver, entrant, sponsor and mechanic of his little 500 and progressed to F1 as a privateer in exactly that manner. He used the moniker ‘Puddle Jumper’ on the side of some of his cars which reveals a good sense of humour and self- it is the way I described myself as a runner in my school cross-country days meaning I was an amateur compared to some of the more serious blokes.

After racing in sportscars, Formula Libre and Formula Junior he bought Keith Greene’s Grand Prix Gilby-BRM retiring from his World Championship debut race at Silverstone that year. He progressed to Brabham’s very first F1 car- BT3, by then BRM P56 V8 engined for 1964 finishing eleventh in the 1965 British GP at Brands- doubtless he was a proud man that day.

Raby, Cooper Mk8 Norton, Brands Hatch, Francis Beart Trophy, 4 September 1955- he won his heat but was unplaced in the final (500race.org)

 

The ‘Puddle Jumper’ Cooper T39 Climax in Denmark circa 1957, details appreciated (unattributed)

Formula 2 was a bit more cost-effective so Ian raced a Merlyn Mk9 Cosworth SCA sporadically in 1965 and a more competitive 1965 Brabham BT14 in 1966. Whilst not running right at the pointy end- it was a Brabham Honda year, and he was a regular Cosworth customer not up the front of the SCA queue- but he finished usually just behind the F1 pros and true ‘coming-men’- eighths at Oulton, eleventh at Goodwood and then a splendid fourth at the Nürburgring in April in front of Rindt, Peter Arundell and Kurt Ahrens- good company!

Rabu had an accident in the Brabham at Brands in October but repaired the car and fitted a Lotus-Ford Twin-cam for the first year of the 1.6 litre F2 in 1967 and slipped down the lists- sometimes he was the best of the twin-cams but they were giving away 20bhp or so at best to the dominant 210bhp FVAs.

Ian was eighth at Snetterton, thirteenth at Silverstone, sixteenth at the Nürburgring that year- far below his performance with a more competitive package the previous year. What shows in just skimming through the results is that he was a finished- he wasn’t the fastest bloke on track but he was consistent and brought the thing home- he could obviously prepare his cars well too.

Raby during the 1963 Silverstone British GP weekend, Gilby BRM, DNF gearbox from Q19- Clark won in a Lotus 25 Climax (unattributed)

 

Ian Raby, British GP, Brands Hatch 1964. Q17 and DNF undisclosed, Brabham BT3 BRM (unattributed)

In the Guards International Trophy meeting at Mallory he was sixth behind Surtees, Gardner, McLaren, Ickx and Allan Rollinson. Ninth in the Limborg GP in Belgium followed and then two appearances at Hockenheim for eighth in June and fifth in the F2 Championship round in July. At Tulln-Langenlebarn, Vienna he finished thirteenth and was a DNF at Jarama in late July.

After that weekend he towed his little Brabham to Holland for the 30 July Grand Prix of Zandvoort on 30 July. Whilst Jacky Ickx set about winning the race in Ken Tyrrell’s Matra MS5 FVA Ian left the road on lap 6 and went through the fence at the very fast Rob Slotemaker Esses, he was extracted from the badly damaged car with critical fractures to his head, back and legs and then seemed to be on the road to recovery before succumbing three months after the accident.

Ian Raby, born 22 September 1921, died on 7 November 1967 aged 46, a dedicated racer taken before his time.

Ian Raby, Brabham BT14 Ford twin-cam, Eiffelrennen, Nurburgring 1967

Credits…

Motorsport, F2 Index, Jornal Dos Classicos, 500 Owners Association, Harry Michelbach

Tailpiece…

(Motorsport)

Jack ranging up to pass the Monopole X88 Panhard Coupe- twentieth overall but not running at the finish- the little 750cc machine was crewed by two Pierres- Chancel and Flauhault.

Finito…

Jim Hall on the front row of the grid, a locale he became quite akin to and fond of in 1964/1965- Laguna Seca in May 1965, Chaparral 2A Chev…

1965 started fantastically for the boys from Midland, Texas with a mighty win over twelve hours at Sebring against the best in the world from Ferrari, Ford, Porsche and the rest- Jim Hall and Hap Sharp took pole, fastest lap and the victory.

The team contested the US Road Racing Championships using the fibreglass chassis 2A Chev- those cars in 1964 won Corry Fields, Laguna Seca, Watkins Glen, Meadowdale and Mid Ohio- Jim Hall took the chequered flag in all of these events with the exception of Mid Ohio when his Chaparral business partner, Hap Sharp triumphed.

Sebring 12 Hour 1965- MG Bridge, the Hall/Sharp winning Chap 2A Chev goes inside the Ryan/Tidwell Porsche 904, behind is the second Hissom/Jennings Chap 2A, the famous deluge of rain which pretty much flooded the place is yet to come ( N Smuckatelli)

 

Jim Hall and Dan Gurney, Chaparral 2A Chev and Lotus 19B Ford during the LA Times GP at Riverside in October 1964 (E Rickman)

 

Roger Penske, Chaparral 2A Chev, LA Times GP 1964 (E Rickman)

In 1965 the Chaparral rout started at Riverside in May when Jim again won and continued through Laguna Seca, Bridghampton and Kent in early August before Hap won at Continental Divide and Mid Ohio in the back-half of August before Hall won the USRRC season-ender at Road America in early September.

Jim Hall on the way to another win, Laguna Seca in May 1965- Chaparral 2A Chev (T Palmieri)

 

Hap in the Corkscrew on the way to second at Laguna in 1965, Chap 2A Chev, Monterey GP in October (W Hewitt)

 

To the winner go the spoils- Jim Hall Laguna USRRC round May 1965 (J Christy)

On 10 October 1965 the more conventional aluminium monocoque 2C Chev made its debut, and won in Jim Hall’s hands at Kent, the 2C formed the basis of the 2E 1966 ‘definitive’ Can-Am challenger. For 1966 the highly popular, successful and growing popularity of sportscar racing in the United States was recognised with the creation of the first Can-Am series all of us got to know and love even across the other side of the Pacific.

Chaparral campaigned the 2E in the Can-Am and 2D Chev coupe in FIA endurance championship events- the team took their first win in that car at the Nürburgring in 1966.

The evolution of the all Chaparral’s, most racing cars for that matter is ongoing, particularly so the lads from Midland in a constant quest for evolution and occasional revolution.

Hall in the 2C Chev during the 1965 Nassau Trophy weekend- led the race until suspension failure when Hap Sharp took over (unattributed)

Traditionally the pro-series of races succeeded the US Road Racing Championship in the latter months of the year with rounds in both Canada and the US. Chaparral opened their 1965 ‘Autoweek Championship’ with a win for Jim in the Canadian Grand Prix at Mosport aboard a 2A in late September 1965- the new 2C made its winning debut at Kent in October 1965- Jim won the Pacific Northwest GP from Hap’s 2A.

At Riverside Hap won in his updated in body 2A, with Jim a non-starter after an accident resulted in suspension damage which could not be made good in time for the 200 mile LA Times Grand Prix. A fortnight later in ‘Vegas Hap won again in his 2A with Jim third in his similar car- Walt Hansgen was second in a John Mecom Lola T70 Ford.

As you will see looking at the various photographs the 2A evolved quite a lot in appearance in from early 1963 to late 1965 and its pretty tricky to pick Hap’s late ’65 fibreglass chassis 2A from Jim’s late ’65 ‘spankers aluminium chassis 2C- see below the wonderful 2A cutaway drawing which inspired this piece.

The cutaway drawing is of the first Chaparral 2 (the A appellation was applied later) which made its race debut during the LA Times GP Riverside weekend of 13 October 1963, so my story should have started about there really, but lets see if we can bridge that gap from this point. So, another nutbag poorly planned piece…

Chaparral 2A and 2C Chev Design and Technical Specifications…

The Chaparral 2A of 1964/5 had evolved enormously from the original car depicted above- the LA Times debutant went like a rocket that weekend leading from pole until sidelined by an electrical fire after four laps despite using off the peg quick solutions such as a Colotti Type 37 four-speed gearbox, Lotus uprights hubs and wheels and front and rear suspension, Cooper steering rack and Girling brakes, not to forget the Chevrolet V8.

Whilst the car was utterly conventional in terms of its suspension front and rear- upper and lower wishbones and coil spring damper units and an adjustable roll bar and inverted lower wishbone, single top link, two radius rods, coil spring damper units an adjustable roll bar using magnesium uprights at both ends- the cars chassis, gearbox and body were far more edgy.

The overall design parameters for the Chap 2 chassis were laid down by Jim Hall and Andy Green of PlasTrend in Fort Worth- Hall plucked Green from the aerospace industry and backed his move to the private sector by becoming his first client- called for an overall weight of 150 pounds and a torsional rigidity of at least 3000 pounds/feet per degree.

The ‘tub’, made of fibreglass reinforced plastic (FRP), comprised pairs of ‘torque boxes’ running down each side connected by bulkheads at each end of the cockpit and extended to the rear suspension mounting points and beyond. It extended right to the cars outside contours (as can be seen in the photographs), up to form the bottom of the door openings, inward to the sides of the Chevrolet V8 and to the drivers elbows and knees in the cockpit. It took full advantage of the sportscar’s overall size to get maximum rigidity from the torque-boxes (the stiffness of a torque box is proportional to its cross-sectional area) and does two jobs in forming part of the car’s outer skin.

At the time of its introduction the chassis was claimed to be the stiffest in motor racing. In the same way that Andrea de Cesaris proved the shuntability of John Barnard’s carbon-fibre McLaren MP4 Ford at the dawn of the eighties- its parent is the Chaparral 2, so too did Jim Hall put it to the test when he used the chassis he damaged at Mosport in late 1964 to win at Sebring in early 1965 partnered by Hap Sharp.

The same principles were applied to the lighter 2C aluminium frame for late 1965 which was closely related to the Chev Corvette GS-2 or ‘actually crafted by Chevrolet’, depending upon your source, we will come to in a little while.

Photograph of a Chaparral ‘fibreglass reinforced epoxy’ chassis from the Library of Philadelphia Collection. ‘…made entirely of fibreglass reinforced epoxy. Moulded in eleven pieces and assembled with an adhesive, the rivets maintaining alignment and gluing pressures. The engine bay is at the bottom with suspension mounting points outboard. Integral seats are above, passenger’s feet fitting into the dark opening at the front (top) of the chassis. The rectangular area will be cut down to form the dashboard cum bulkhead, and in the illustration (ute is justaposed to help with providing an idea of size) hides the front suspension mounting points. The round holes are for access to interior mounting points and the fuel tank…Chaparral designed by Jim Hall…with chassis elements designed and fabricated by Andy Green of PlasTrends…’

 

Chevrolet 3 speed and reverse spur gear non-syncro gearbox downstream of a torque converter (D Kimble)

The Chaparral 2 initially used, as mentioned above, a Colotti 5-speed manual gearbox until sufficient testing miles at Rattlesnake proved the durability and performance advantages of a Chevrolet designed and built automatic transaxle, the advantages of  which included  reliability, avoidance of driver error in terms of missed shifts or over-revs, and reduction in shock-loads to other components in the drivetrain. From a drivers perspective braking can be more accurate without the need to heel ‘n toe

The auto boxes were first raced at Laguna Seca in 1964, Hall and Sharp later claimed that it was only after a discussion between Dave McDonald and Dan Gurney after Mosport three meetings later after they listening to the cars in close company, that Dan asked Hall about the type of gearbox he was using.

The compact Chevrolet made unit comprised a hydraulic torque converter and compact two speed (three speed from the 2E) transaxle usually cast in magnesium. The ‘automatic’ was really operated manually. Before starting the driver engaged first gear and pressed the brakes with his left foot, releasing it upon ‘taking off’- literally. Gear changes to second (and top in the 3 speeder) were made by easing the throttle and moving the gear lever- downshifts were made similarly with a blip of the throttle. Those of us who have lost the use of a clutch have operated our Hewlands similarly. All Chaparral braking was done with the left foot- this left a foot free to operate the ‘flipper’ which we will come to shortly.

Suspension development was continuous from 1963-1965 with all of the bought in components replaced by bespoke Chaparral designed and built items as the performance envelope of the machine increased not least because of advances in polymer chemistry as applied to racing tyres- Chaparral’s ongoing testing of Firestone products provided plenty of valuable input in that regard. Brakes were Chaparral made cast iron solid discs clasped by Girling calipers front and rear.

The wheels were also bespoke, the development of which was first required to get brake temperatures down, the Chaparral spoke-like web structure wheels were strong, light and had a 1.5 inch advantage to the inner-wheel path through which heat radiated. Other advantages were that the bead depression or drop centre, necessary in ordinary wheels to get the bead over the rim flanges was neatly eliminated by making the outer rim flange detachable from the main wheel body- the absence of the depression provided an extra inch and a half on the inside diameter. A further advantage is that the same wheel body was used front and rear, as only the outer rim flange has to be changed to produce a wider rear rim.

See the sequence of photographs below, mainly taken over the Nassau Trophy weekend late each year, from 1961 to 1965 to see the rate of Chaparral technological progress from using someone else’s front-engined chassis in 1960 technological tour de force by 1965, make that 1963!

Jim Hall, aboard the Troutman & Barnes built Chaparral 1 Chev Nassau 1961 (D Friedman)

 

Jim Hall’s brand new Chaparral 2A Chev upon debut during the 1963 LA Times GP 13 October weekend- pole and led until an electrical fire intervened (D Friedman)

 

Jim Hall, Chaparral 2A Chev and AJ Foyt Scarab Mk4 Chev Nassau 1963 (D Friedman)

 

Hap Sharp Chaparral 2A Chev Nassau 1964 (E d Faille)

 

Jim Hall, Chaparral 2C Chev, Nassau 1965 (unattributed)

Together with the car’s chassis, the Chaparral bodies are of great interest given how visibly they were at the forefront of automotive aerodynamics of the time.

The original 1963 body was based on some Chevrolet wind tunnel data but when tested at Midland the car became very light at 120mph which gave rise to the ‘snow-plough’ air dams first used at Riverside in 1963 and very evident in the Nassau 1963 shot- this solution, Chaparral  were the first to do it, was the result of ‘fooling around’ with test track fixes. The team found the approach worked well on smooth surfaces with a ground clearance of circa 2.5 inches from the ground.

The first major redesign of the body was a new front end which solved one problem but gave rise to rear end lift, the solution to which was a vertical lip attached to the rear of the car- a spoiler, it was not an original solution having been first deployed by Ferrari at Sebring in 1961.

As speeds continued to increase more front end lift occurred which was countered by the small  appendages shown in many of the accompanying photographs low on nose of the cars on each side- these were first fitted to Hap’s car at Riverside in May 1965- they grew at Mosport a month later into ‘cowcatchers’ of the type seen on steam-locos! These vanes or trim-tabs remained. The rear of the car evolved as well, often in fine detail, with the 2C eliminating the high ducts on the flanks for engine compartment cooling which was discovered were not required.

Hall’s #66 2C alongside Sharp’s upgraded 2A at Nassau in 1965. Note the size and pivot for the ‘flipper’  aerofoil, what would later be described as a wing- the mounts either side are ‘fences’ to guide the airflow where it was required. Bob Bondurant’s Lola T70 is just in shot (A Bochroch)

 

2A cockpit during the USRRC weekend at Riverside in May 1965- 2 speed ‘box (D Friedman)

The movable spoiler or ‘flipper’ attracted plenty of attention at the time- it was introduced on Jim’s new 2C and fitted to Hap’s 2A- the aerofoil was mounted between two fins either side of the car, the angle of which was pivoted by the action of the a pedal using the drivers (available) left foot. On the straights it was flat- parallel to the cars body, in corners inclined. An extra master cylinder, a small pedal to the left and a hydraulic piston comprised the actuating mechanism. The default setting was of course the safe one- ‘up’, to exert maximum downforce.

So equipped, the 2C won its first race but Jim was  bothered by the deterioration in road holding caused by the much stiffer springs needed to resist the high levels of downforce generated- a case of solving one problem and causing another! Over that Winter of 1965-6 he and his engineer friends at Chevrolet worked out a way to mount the wings directly to the rear suspension uprights thereby bypassing a sprung chassis and permitting a return to ‘more supple’ springs- the dramatic 2E.

At the time the aerodynamics of very fast cars travelling over 150mph was limited, Hall wryly observed ‘…very few people know much about automobile aerodynamics, especially in the 150-200mph range but have strong opinions because they held their hand out the window of the family car once’! Wind tunnel tests provided some information but didn’t then reproduce what is happening under the car. In a tunnel there was no relative speed between the cars underside and the road surface and the wheels were usually not turning in an aerodynamic test. Hall operated on the basis of data obtained from tests at Rattlesnake…all of this is somewhat prophetic given the short period of five years which was to elapse from the time of this 1965 interview with Jim Hall and the 1969 developed 1970 raced staggering, revolutionary 2J Chev ground effect ‘Sucker’ Vic Elford and Jackie Stewart raced in the 1970 Can-Am.

Vic Elford in front of one of the McLaren M8D Chevs at Laguna Seca in 1970, Chaparral 2J Chev, a package with bristles with innovation and original thinking from every pore (Getty)

When discussing most Can-Am cars of the period much of the narrative is around the engines used given the chassis and aerodynamics of most of the customer cars at least, were ‘pretty similar’- not so with the Chaparrals given the chassis (sometimes), ‘automatic’ transmission and aerodynamics where the ubiquitous Chev engines were secondary but of course whilst they were Chevs, they were trick ones…

At the time it was said ‘Chaparral are having less Chevrolet engine trouble than anybody else’s cars’- Sharp and Hall attributed that to their engines being more nearly stock than any of the others! Mind you they were using aluminium blocks and heads ‘the result of happy circumstances in which Alcoa salesman (at the time) Roger Penske) talked Chevrolet Division into getting hold of the tooling originally intended for Gran Sport Corvette use’. By doing so they saved about 110 pounds over the cast iron engine, but the aluminium block limited them to the stock bore, hence they ran at a capacity of 327cid.

Interestingly and logically since adopting the ‘auto tranny’, the engines were tweaked for a wide spread of torque rather than for outright power- ‘the transmission does not allow nearly constant engine speed to be maintained over a large band of road speeds and because it has only one stepped gear reduction there isn’t a chance to keep the engine in a narrow speed band by changing gears often.’

Hall and Sharp said the engines used many standard parts- handy as they had just bought the Midland Chev Dealership at the time! Pistons were standard but for a stress relieving hole drilled at each end of the slot in the oil-ring groove to stop cracks. Also stock were the crank, main bearings and rods with all reciprocating parts sized, balanced and very carefully assembled. At the time the engines were good for circa 415bhp @ 6800rpm and 380 pounds/foot of torque @ 5200rpm. Proposed for 1966 was a shift to 58mm Webers from the 48s then used. The 327cid Chev designed aluminium V8, or 5360cc if you like, had a 4/3.25 inch bore/stroke, Chaparral modified it used a compression ratio of 10:1, Bosch ignition and four Weber 146 HCF 5 carburettors

With the constant evolution of the three 2s (it’s only in more recent times the 2A appellation has been applied) they gradually porked up a bit in weight- but getting faster in the process and ‘nicer to drive’ as Hall put it. They decided upon an aluminium chassis for the 2C to get the weight down albeit the chassis ‘was of the same basic design’- as a consequence the ally tub was 70 pounds lighter than the fibreglass ones and the overall all up car weight of the car 100 pounds lighter.

Interesting at the time- as subsequent events proved neither Hall or Sharp were ‘completely sold on aluminium yet’ raising concerns about the crash safety merits of the two materials observing an accident would inevitably destroy the whole aluminium frame whereas a ‘plastic one can be repaired by bonding in new pieces’ but Hall didn’t profess to know about what was safe and what was not in an accident.

The sportscars.tv article concludes ‘…this then is a brief summary of development to date. Central to the story is the fact that the car has remained adequately fast for two years instead of the usual one. No really drastic changes have been made, but the evolutionary process has been such that today’s Chaparral 2C doesn’t look that much like that original 2.’

‘When the first 2C appeared at Kent, Washington in September 1965 there was anticipation that the new car would be revolutionary whereas the 2C ‘really isn’t the new car but a refinement of the 2 but gets the C suffix as its builders thought the changes were significant enough to warrant that descriptor.’

The central body of the 2C is lower than the 2, the guards are of the same height. The body width was cut by six inches, the front and rear suspension geometry was modified a tad for more anti-dive, lift and squat. ‘A total of 100 pounds has been saved by the use of the aluminium chassis, and all the latest body revisions are incorporated, but it is not nearly as significant as will be the Chaparral 3 when it appears though we make no pretence of knowing when that will be…’ the author wrote.

Perhaps this is the revolution referred to above!- at least the 1966 one anyway. Jim Hall’s patent application drawing for ‘Aerodynamic spoiler for automotive vehicles’ of 15 July 1969 to protect the intellectual property expressed in the 1966 Chaparral 2E Chev. Note the names of the designers- Jim, Jerry Mrlik, James Musser and Frank Winchell.

Chaparral 2A mechanicals…

(D Friedman)

(D Friedman)

The bunch of shots above are of the Chaparral 2A #001 during its first race meeting- the 1963 LA Times GP 200 miler at Riverside over the 13 October 1963 weekend.

Tests at Midland in this chassis with a Buick engine initially, and then the Chev have already resulted in the spoilers at the front to keep the car on the ground. The new machine started from pole and was leading when retired.

(D Friedman)

Nice shot showing the overall layout of the car and big, strong fibreglass chassis, plenty of interest from the punters not least John Surtees at right thinking ‘How am I going to explain a plastic car on pole to Enzo?’.

(D Friedman)

Mickey Thompson and Jim. Happy with the speed of their steed no doubt.

(D Friedman)

Notice the way the chassis goes all the way to the back of the car to support the engine and Colotti Type 37 4-speed gearbox, suspension Lotus based inclusive of uprights and wheels at this stage.

Front suspension from above as per text- upper and lower wishbones and coil spring/dampers. Steering rack is Cooper, fuel tank filler open, again note the chassis.

(D Friedman)

 

(D Friedman)

Rear suspension detail, note the spare wheel- Lotus ‘Wobbly-Webs’.

(D Friedman)

That front end is savage on the eye, data from Chev upon which it was based fell short- the radical front spoilers were a fix improved upon by the first new nose shown throughout this article. Nice cockpit shot and aluminium Chev small block.

(K Breslauer)

Final shot of 2A #001 in its earliest form is a month and a bit later in the December 1963 Nassau Oakes Field paddock.

 

(E d Faille)

Franz Weis sets to on Roger Penske’s 2A at Nassau in 1964.

Jim and Sandy Hall are there too, this is a post race shot where the cars suspension is being repaired in-situ. Penske took over Sharp’s car during the mandatory pitstop and they shared the win. Note the spoiler is inserted into a slot in the tail, located by fasteners.

(A Bochroch)

With Jim Hall’s arm in a cast Penske drove the second team car at Nassau- here in the course of pre-event preparation, Roger slipped off the track in the rain- breaking the car’s suspension- thanks to Hap’s generosity Roger shared the win. Notice the fibreglass chassis, ‘stack pipes’ and wheels.

 

(A Bochroch)

2A, same theme in the Sebring pits in 1965 before Jim and Hap go out and whip all the big guys. Hall is on his iPhone by the wall amongst the spare wheels- they raced two cars that weekend.

Note in particular the ‘plastic fantastic’ full monocoque chassis, of which we get a really good gander- it goes right to the back of the car to which everything is affixed, none of yer load bearing engines et al here.

Big steering wheel, small light above the roundel to illuminate number 3, inspection/access cover open below the coolant top tank, lotsa pipes- both inlet (Weber carbs) and outlet, big cast iron disc and that GM automatic transmission covered out of secrecy or fun…Marvellous, the more you look, the more you see.

 

(K Ludvigsen)

Hap Sharp’s 2A in the Riverside paddock, LA Times GP meeting in October 1965.

You can do your own compare and contrasts over the ensuing twelve months from Nassau in late 1964 but the front winglets, copious venting of the guards to allow trapped air to escape and plenty more rubber on the road are obvious.

(B Tronolone)

Nice shot of Hap Sharp with Jim Hall behind him, again at Riverside in October 1965.

Note the front winglets on Haps 2A and Jim’s 2C but the absence of the guard venting on the latest 2C compared with the earlier car. Hap’s also has the huge vent taking lotsa air into the cockpit which I guess is a driver preference thing. These close-up shots are gold really if yer get yer rocks off on this kinda minutae…

Chaparral 2C mechanicals…

(B Tronolone)

Jim Hall and his new 2C in the Riverside pitlane in October 1965.

Bob Tronolone took the shot above of Hap and then walked a few metres and captured Jim.

So the compare and contrast is of Hap’s ‘ultimate spec’ 2A and Jim’s new 2C- the chassis are different, bodywork similar, noting the comments above about the front guards- both machines are fitted with the movable rear ‘flipper’.

(E d Faille)

2C Nassau 1965 butt shot above and then this splendid ‘in all of its naked glory’ photograph again at Nassau below.

These big-block American iron are such enormous, heavy muvvas one gets a very clear sense of the packaging challenge. It doesn’t matter how low you can mount the thing in your you-beaut monocoque, 327cid of V8 still sits in the air like a country-long drop dunny!- mind you, half the height is inlet manifolds and carbs.

I think of these wheels as archetypal Chaparral! What a gorgeous but brutal instrument of war- during the race the right front suspension failed, the car left the course damaging the rear suspension and tub as well. The latter wasn’t too bad though being rebuilt as the first 2E- tagged 2E-001.

(E d Faille)

 

Jim aboard the 2C at Riverside in October 1965 during the LA Times GP 200 mile race.

Etcetera…

In the best of clever racing tradition, making use of what you have- and what still works the mix ‘n match of Chaparral 2 chassis is as follows;

#2A-001 reconstructed into 2D-001

#2A-002 reconstructed as 2D-002 (1966 endurance coupe), then 2F-001 (1967 endurance coupe) and ultimately restored as it began- 2A-002, no doubt some of you lucky folks have been thru the Chaparral Museum

#2A-003 reconstructed into 2F-002

#2A-004 chassis unused

#2C-001 reconstructed into 2E-001 (1966 Can-Am car) then later used as 2G (1967 Can-Am car) and restored as 2E

#2E-002 destroyed in Jim Hall’s accident 1966

#2H restored as was, 1969 ‘unloved by John Surtees’ Can-Am car

#2J restored  as was, 1970 Can-Am ‘Sucker-Car’

#2K 1980 Indy winner restored as such

(Getty)

Superb looking racing car- 2C Chev in the LA Times GP Riverside pitlane in 1965.

Bibliography…

‘Can-Am’ Pete Lyons, sportscars.tv article ‘Chaparral 2C – Work Leading To’

Photo Credits…

Getty Images- Eric Rickman, Toby Palmieri, John Christy, T&E Fornander, David Friedman Collection, gtplanet.net, chaparral.com, Eric della Faille, Albert R Bochroch, William Hewitt, Nigel Smuckatelli, Karl Ludvigsen, Kenneth Breslauer

Tailpiece: 

Oh for a future of substance for Chaparral…

Finito…

(HRCCT)

Chris Amon eases his Ferrari 350 Can-Am into Pub Corner, Longford village during the raceday sportscar support in 1968…

There are plenty of marshals but not too many spectators in evidence on this famously soggy day- the last day of motor racing at Longford. I’ve done this topic to death really but there is no such thing as too much Amon, Ferrari or Longford. See here for the P4/Can-Am 350; https://primotipo.com/2015/04/02/ferrari-p4canam-350-0858/

here for Longford; https://primotipo.com/2018/07/05/longford-lap/

and here for the 1968 Tasman feature race, the ‘South Pacific Trophy’; https://primotipo.com/2015/10/20/longford-tasman-south-pacific-trophy-4-march-1968-and-piers-courage/

Credits…

Historic Racing Car Club of Tasmania- D Cooper Collection

Tailpiece: Ferrari P4/Can-Am 350 ‘0858’ at rest, Longford- in the dry 1968…

(D Cooper)

And not a soul in those stands at this particular point of the day.

Finito…

(M de Lang)

No Australian racer comes close to owning and racing as many interesting cars as Bob Jane…

The tough nut from Brunswick developed a used car business initially, and shortly thereafter took on new car franchises before creating ‘specialist tyre retailing’ in this country- Bob Jane T-Marts are as iconic now as they were novel in the late sixties when Jane initially rolled the arm over with what was a new concept here.

Bob was the embodiment of ‘living life to the full’, he did not die guessing. Calder Park’s owner collected wives with as much enthusiasm as he did racing cars but found that they are not as easy to unload as last years Holden, the complications of his various ‘families’ screwed the later decades of his life comprehensively, which was a great shame as someone who gave much to many.

Big hitters. Niel Allen, Bob Jane and Frank Matich in Matich’s Firestone Racing Tyres tent at Sandown, circa 1967/8 at a guess. The vented guard belongs to Bob’s Elfin 400 Repco (M Kyval)

I’m not suggesting the man was perfect i might add, but in a motor racing sense he put far more into the sport than he ever took out.

This series of paintings were commissioned of Martin de Lang to celebrate the fortieth anniversary of Bob and Harry Firth’s Ford Cortina GT, Bathurst 500 win in 1963. I’ve set them more or less in the chronological order Bob raced them, there were plenty more Jane owned racing cars than this though, check out the list at the end of the article.

The painting at the article’s outset shows Bob’s Maserati 300S in front of his great mate, Lou Molina’s Molina Monza Holden-Repco from Doug Whiteford’s Maserati 300S and then Bill Pitt’s Jaguar D Type at Albert Park on 23 November 1958- Bob and Lou are about to be lapped by the other duo during the 32 lap, circa 100 mile Victorian Tourist Trophy won by Whiteford from Ron Phillips’ Cooper Jaguar and Pitt, Bob was fifth and Lou unplaced.

(K Drage)

In the beginning.

Kevin Drage’s shot of Bob is at Fishermans Bend on the race debut of his ex-works 300S ‘3059’ in October 1958. Doug Whiteford and Jane (in Bob’s case after Reg Smith had it briefly first) acquired the Officine Maserati cars raced by Jean Behra ‘3055’, and Stirling Moss ‘3059’ during the 1956 Australian Grand Prix/Australian Tourist Trophy weekends in late 1956.

Bob was initially rough and ready in it, even inspiring Reg Hunt to move his boat further out into Albert Park Lake to keep it out of harms way- he did get the hang of this racing caper mind you. Stephen Dalton’s first competition outing for Bob Jane, he believes, was in a Ford Customline at Hepburn Springs hillclimb in October 1956. See here for an article on the 300S;

https://primotipo.com/2015/05/15/bob-jane-maserati-300s-albert-park-1958/

(B Jane)

Another shot of Bob at Albert Park on the same weekend depicted in the opening painting. In a decade of stunningly beautiful racing cars as curvaceous as Sophia Loren, surely the 300S is up there for the title of the prima-donna sportscar of the fifties?

 

(M de Lang)

Jane’s locally developed Appendix J Jaguar Mk2, ultimately raced at 4.1 litres, won his first couple of Australian Touring Car Championships (ATCC) in the days the title was decided in one race- in 1962 at Longford and 1963 at Mallala.

See the article here about the car; https://primotipo.com/2014/10/20/australian-touring-car-championship1962-longford-tasmania-battle-of-the-jag-mk2s/

Warwick Farm circa 1962 (J Psaros)

 

(M de Lang)

The factory Jaguar E Type Lightweight didn’t make a lot of sense given the way it fitted into our local class structure at the time, and given the lack of endurance events in Australia of the type for which the car was built, but who can argue with the beauty and spectacle it provided all the same. Mind you, Bob did win the one race Australian GT Championship at Calder in December 1963, I rather suspect 10 miles could not really be characterised as an endurance event.

This machine, like Bob’s 300S and D Type, he retained for decades but was ultimately sold, global cars that they are- all left Australia, which is a bummer.

(B Miles)

Spencer Martin with the white helmet in hand, John Sawyer and Bob leaning on the delicate aluminium panels of his car at Lakeside before the start of a heat of the Australian Tourist Trophy in 1965- Ron Thorp’s AC Cobra is on the row behind. See here for a piece on Bob’s E Types, he had a couple, as one does; https://primotipo.com/2018/04/15/perk-and-pert/

 

(M de Lang)

Whilst Jane raced single seaters and won in sportscars he was most formidable in all types of touring cars from Series Production machines such as the Cortina GT in which he won at Bathurst in 1963 together with Harry Firth, through to the animal savagery of the Chev Monza Sports Sedan shown further on.

The Jane/Firth pair won three of these 500 mile production car enduros on the trot, the first was the 1961 Armstong 500 at Phillip Island aboard an ‘Autoland’ Mercedes Benz 220SE-they then followed up in a ‘works’ Ford Falcon XL in 1962.

 

Harry Firth behind the wheel of the winning Cortina GT, Murrays Corner, Mount Panorama 1963- that’s Max Volkers in a FoMoCo Cortina 1500 behind (unattributed)

In 1963 the event moved to Mount Panorama as the ‘Islands track surface was too badly damaged by the ’62 event to continue to stage the race- in fact racing came to an end there until Len Lukey bought the facility circa 1964, reopening it in 1967. At Bathurst they won in a ‘works’ Ford Cortina GT.

In 1964 Jane won again in a ‘works’ Cortina GT but this time shared the drive with George Reynolds- all of these ‘factory Fords’ were prepared by Harry Firth and his team in his ‘Marne Garage’ on the corner of Burke and Toorak Roads, Glen Iris in Melbourne’s twee inner east.

 

(unattributed)

Jane’s first 1965 Ford Mustang was locally developed with plenty of goodies bought over the counter in the US, it met an untimely end at Catalina Park in an accident the young entrepreneur was extremely lucky to walk away from.

The shot above shows it in rude good health at Warwick Farm entering Pit Straight, whereas it is in its death throes in Martin’s painting below, 7 November 1965.

(M de Lang)

 

 

(unattributed)

She is well and truly rooted- the angle from the other side is worse but I don’t have a clear, sharp shot from there to pop up. It was a case of pull all the good bits off and start again- Bob is clear with the white blotch on his head, I think its a flaw in the photo rather than Nurse Ratched gone berserk with bandages.

‘Cripes, its gunner need more than bog to fix this lot!’

RF Jane with Nomex shirt reflects upon the remains of a Mustang which was pristine ten minutes before. Leo Geoghegan looks on from behind whilst Bob Jane Racing Chief John Sawyer ponders gathering up the pile of shrapnel and popping it into the truck before the long trip back to Melbourne.

 

(M de Lang)

Bob certainly had a penchant for Mustangs, this is his second, a 1967 GT fitted with a big-block 390cid V8 and also raced later with small-block engines.

It met its maker when Chris Brauer had a very nasty career ending accident in it at Lakeside in 1970. Bob replaced this one with the 1968 Shelby built Trans-Am factory car, it still exists in the US.

The livery and specifications of this car evolved a lot over a short space of time not least driven by the needs of ever widening tyres with the photograph below in the machines at Warwick Farm in 1967.

(B Williamson)

If any Mustang enthusiast can give me details of the evolution of this car’s specifications from 1967 to 1970 please get in touch and i will add them in.

Jane is blasting across the top of Mount Panorama in de Lang’s photo above at a guess, whereas in the photograph below he is exiting Hell Corner, after a change to Shell colours, circa 1967. Perhaps this photo is a Shell shot given the background. The grille evolved to a simpler, later look too making identification of the car and year tricky, especially in monochrome!

(unattributed)

 

(M de Lang)

Pure touring car sex on wheels. Moffat’s Trans-Am, Foley’s GTaM and this John Sheppard built LC Holden Torana GTR-XU1 Repco ‘620’ 4.4 V8 Sports Sedan are my favourite Taxis.

This jigger was brilliant in conception and exquisite in the detail of its execution right down to the ‘standard interior trim’ and an engine compartment which looked as though it was made for a Repco V8 rather than an inline-six. The art shows Bob at Hume Weir circa 1971.

Just brilliant, not to forget the shedload of races Bob and John Harvey won in the thing circa 1970-1972. Bob should be shot for allowing Frank Gardner to commit automotive rape upon the little sweetie when he shoved a 5 litre Chev into it in 1975- although FG did squeeze an extra season up front despite said atrocity…

Warwick Farm, 5 September 1971 (L Hemer)

CAMS took exception to the wing, which was fair enough, it was outside the rules, but didn’t it look even more of a menace in this specification?

Extant but not likely to see the light of day until someone with very deep pockets scoops it up- there is a bit about this car in this article about McCormack’s Charger Repco and Sports Sedans more generally; https://primotipo.com/2015/06/30/hey-charger-mccormacks-valiant-charger-repco/

 

(M de Lang)

Didn’t Jane put the cat amongst the pidgeons with this Chev Camaro ZL1 427 ally blocked weapon! The painting depicts the car at Dandenong Road corner, Sandown 1971.

Looking at it reminds me of the spectacle of ‘full on body contact’ between Bob and Allan Moffat’s Mustang Trans-Am in 1971-2. Bob won the ATCC in 1971 with the big fella fitted and when shafted by CAMS, who changed the rules to eliminate the 427 motor, stuck it up the regulator and won again fitted with the ‘liddl 350 cast iron engine in 1972.  ‘Nice one’, i thought at the time, plenty of lawyers improved their billings for the year by being involved in some serious litigation between RF Jane and the CAMS down the decades.

(unattributed)

Ere we go again…

Did Moffat lose it or did Bob give him a Rock Hudson to assist?

With the splendour of Springvale ‘Triple Fronted Brick Vanilla Slices’- 1950’s cream brick-veneer houses of the type I was brought up in, in the background, Moffat and Jane engage in a territorial dispute under brakes into Sandown’s Dandenong Road- meanwhile Graham ‘Tubby’ Ritter takes avoiding action at right. Cooper S pilot folks? Jane won this race.

‘I still don’t know if he hit the Armco?’ quipped Lynton Hemer @ the precision of this particular apex, 9 July 1972 (L Hemer)

 

(M de Lang)

The HQ Holden Monaro GTS 350 started life as an Improved Tourer in late 1972- its race debut was in John Harvey’s hands that year at Surfers Paradise, but morphed into a most formidable Sports Sedan when Group C replaced Improved Touring as the class to which the ATCC was run from 1973- Pat Purcell modified the car further as the Sports Sedan rules allowed.

Another Sheppo built car originally, it raced in Bob’s hands until 1978 and still exists restored to its original form, the art depiction is probably Oran Park whilst noting the signage isn’t correct.

(B Keys)

Nice and close at ‘Torana’ as it then was or ‘Peters’ as it originally was, corner at Sandown circa 1974/5.

Bob has the Monaro tucked inside John Pollard who has given the faster car room in his Holden Torana L34.

Hallmarks of all of Jane’s cars, whoever was Boss Cocky of the team at the time was the immaculate standard of presentation and preparation. I’ve always been fond of the look of HQ’s, surely one of the most harmonious and fully resolved of all of GMH’s styling exercises- lowered and with plenty of wheel and tyre under the ample guards they were/are mighty fine looking road cars with this beast, and Mal Ramsay’s HQ Kingswood Repco visual delights as racing cars.

 

(M de Lang)

One can easily imagine the excitement around the Jane transporter at race meetings circa 1971 with their bit of the paddock occupied by the Camaro, Torana, Brabham BT36 Waggott 2 litre and this McLaren M6B Repco ‘740’ V8 5 litre- which won a pair of Australian Sportscar Championships in 1971 and 1972.

Excitement around the Bob Jane transporter, or Shell tent anyway, circa 1965. Nose of the Mk2 Jag at left, first Mustang, E Type Lwt and nose of the Elfin Mono at right (M Kyval)

The story of this thing, one of the best looking Can-Am cars ever built, is told here; https://primotipo.com/2019/10/16/sex-on-wheels/ ,the art is of Bob at the wheel, circuit who knows, it could be anywhere, whereas the shot below is of Bob giving John Harvey a lift just after Harves won the Symmons Plains round of the 1972 ASCC- and the championship itself.

(E French)

 

Who could ignore Sports Sedans, even as a devout open-wheeler woofda, with savage beasts like this thing providing quite a show.

Watching Bob drive this car was magic, seeing Peter Brock race it after Bob retired was sensational- he teased everything out of Pat Purcell’s magnificent racer, another painting at Sandown’s Dandenong Road corner.

(C Parker)

Chris Parker caught all the heavies on the grid at Calder August 1982- Australian GT Championship round 6, heat 1- Alan Jones won every race of the nine round championship.

Alan Jones is on pole in the Porsche Cars Australia Porsche 935 alongside Peter Brock in Jane’s Monza, on the row two is Jim Richards’ black BMW 318i turbo and alongside him Tony Edmondson’s Alfa Romeo Alfetta GTV Chev and then the white Colin Bond driven PCA Porsche 944 GTR turbo- on his inside is Rusty French’ Porsche 935. On the back row on the inside is Brad Jones’ Mercedes SLC and on this side the Bob Jolly Holden Commodore. They really were the most exciting grids of things at the time even if the 935’s rained on everybody else’s parade…

Everything about this car was big! Originally built by a team led by Pat Purcell it was raced by Bob from 1980, then rebuilt by Pat and Les Small before being raced by Peter Brock in 1982/3, then Allan Grice raced it in 1984 to an Australian GT Championship and then Bryan Thomson to the title the following year. It morphed into a Toyota Supra in 1989- where is it now? Click here for a summary of the car; http://www.scharch.org/Cars/Monza_Racecars/Cars_MonzaAU_Purcell-Jane.htm

(B Jane)

Peter Brock awaits the start at Calder circa 1983- the formidable size of the car evident in this shot- 6 litre Chev V8 upfront and a transaxle at the rear.

Etcetera…

The list of cars Bob owned and raced, or were raced for him by others is as below. It isn’t complete, it’s out of my head, i am happy to add others to the ‘good stuff’, no road cars only racers he owned…

Sportscars

Maserati 300S, Jaguar D Type, Jaguar E Type 3.8 FHC, Jaguar E Type Lwt, Elfin 400 Repco 4.4, McLaren M6B Repco 5 litre

Single-seaters

Elfin T100 ‘Mono’ Ford twin-cam 1.5, Brabham BT11A Climax 2.5, Brabham BT23E Repco V8 2.5, Jane Repco V8 2.5, Brabham BT36 Waggott TC-4V 2 litre, Bowin P8 Repco-Holden F5000, Ralt RT4 Ford BDA F Pac, McLaren M26 Chev F5000

Tourers

Ford Customline, Holden ‘Humpys’, Jaguar Mk2 4.1, Mercedes Benz 220SE, Ford Falcon XK, Fiat 2300, Lotus Cortina, Ford Mustangs- three of em- 1965, 1967 and 1968 Shelby Trans-Am, Ford Falcon GT ‘XR’, Chev Camaro ZL1, Holden Torana GTR-XU1 Repco 4.4, Holden Torana GTR-XU1 Series Prod/Group C, Holden Monaro GTS 350 Imp Tourer/Sports Sedan, Holden Monaro GTS 350 Series Prod, Chev Monza, BMW 635Csi, Holden Torana L34, Holden Torana A9X, two Mercedes Cosworth 190. In addition there were numerous ‘Thunderdome’ thingies

Not bad is it- in one lifetime.

The ‘Jane Estate’- those two words are a catch-all of ‘Jane Family individuals, corporate entities and trusts’, i think, still own the Brabham BT11A, Ralt RT4 and McLaren M6B. I am happy to take advice from those who have the facts rather than ‘i reckon’…

Image and other Credits…

Martin de Lang- artist, Stephen Dalton

Mike Kyval, Kevin Drage, Bill Miles, Chris Parker, Jock Psaros, Ellis French, Lynton Hemer, Bruce Keys, Bob Williamson Collection, Bob Jane Heritage Collection

Tailpiece…

(M de Lang)

Peter Brock in the Porsche 956 he shared with Larry Perkins at Silverstone and Le Mans in 1983- didn’t this ‘Aussies taking on the world attack’ capture us all at the time.

It symbolises a few things not least Bob’s world view and a couple of blokes in a very long list Jane supported from the early sixties…

Finito…

(L Richards)

David McKay, babe and Aston Martin DB3S, Chevron Hotel, St Kilda Road, Melbourne 1958…

The event is the ‘Smiths Motor Convention’ which by the look of it is a motor industry jolly aimed at the trade rather than retail punters. Those amongst you who were attendees can fill us in.

This is the first of McKay’s two Aston DB3S’, the story of which is told here, rather than repeat myself; https://primotipo.com/2017/09/28/david-mckays-aston-martin-db3ss/

David McKay was noted throughout his long career as a racer, entrant and journalist for his dapper appearance- one can only assume therefore that the ‘bombay bloomer’ trouser suit was the de-rigueur clobber for the man-about-town of the day.

A good time was had by all by the look- and yes, the bones of the ‘Chevvy’, a favourite night spot of Melbourne revellers for generations are still in St Kilda Road albeit, inevitably, the building is essentially an apartment complex these days.

(L Richards)

A Zephyr, an old beast an interviewer and a couple of lovelies, must be the prize giving part of proceedings I guess…

Photo Credits…

Laurie Richards Studio

Finito…

 

(D Cooper)

Antipodian enthusiasts can argue the toss but I think the 1968 Tasman was about as good as it ever got…

Here Clark, Amon and Hill- Lotus 49 Ford DFW, Ferrari Dino 246T and 49. Two Cosworth V8’s and a Maranello V6. There were a swag of Repco V8’s of different configurations, BRM V8’s and V12’s- Len Terry’s new P126 was blooded in the Tasman in advance of the F1 season, Alec Mildren’s Brabham BT23D Alfa Romeo using a 2.5 litre variant of the Tipo 33 sports prototype V8, plus cars using the good ole Coventry Climax four cylinder FPF.

As good as it gets in terms of variety of cars and drivers- in addition to the fellas on the front row of the dry, preliminary, Saturday race we had Jack Brabham, Denny Hulme, Bruce McLaren (in NZ), Frank Gardner, Pedro Rodriguez, Piers Courage, Richard Attwood…apart from the local hotshots.

Clark and Hill raced 49’s ‘R2’ and ‘R1’ during their 1968 tour down south.

Hill had mainly raced ‘R1’ since the 49’s race debut at Zandvoort on 4 June 1967. He joined Team Lotus in Australia whereas Jim did the full eight weeks and had almost exclusively raced ‘R2’ from his first up win in the chassis amongst the Dutch dunes. Motors fitted for the Tasman were Cosworth’s 2.5 litre variant of the 3 litre Ford DFV dubbed ‘DFW’.

(D Cooper)

Jimmy has a tyre issue he is sorting with the Firestone man.

The fag packet Gold Leaf Players livery is new- the cars were green and gold at Pukekohe and Levin and red, white and gold at Wigram only a month or so before Longford, as shown in the Wigram front row photograph below. That’s Denny’s F2 Brabham BT23 Ford FVA behind Jim in the Longford pitlane.

(B Wilson)

Clark has won his last championship GP by this stage, the South African at Kyalami on New Years Day, 1 January 1968, he won at Sandown the week before Longford on 25 February taking the Australian Grand Prix, his last, from Chris in a ‘thriller-driller’ of a race which could have gone either way right to the finish line.

Racing’s tectonic plates shifted with his Lotus 48 Ford FVA F2 death in Hockenheim only months hence.

(D Cooper)

In a tour de force of leadership Graham Hill picked up Team Lotus lock, stock and barrel and drove the team forward as Colin Chapman regained his composure and focus after the death of his great colleague and friend.

No seatbelt in Graham’s car above, there would be by seasons end.

No wings either, there would be by mid-season, 1968 was a year of change in so many ways.

Wings here; https://primotipo.com/2015/07/12/wings-clipped-lotus-49-monaco-grand-prix-1969/, and in more detail, here; https://primotipo.com/2016/08/19/angle-on-the-dangle/

Chris loads up in the Longford paddock. That’s Denny’s Brabham BT23 Ford FVA F2 atop the Alec Mildren Racing transporter behind (D Cooper)

The Scuderia Ferrari presence, or more precisely Chris Amon’s single Ferrari 246T raced under his own banner raised enormous interest, the great Kiwi did not disappoint either- and of course came back the following year with a two car squad and won.

In Australia we got a double 1968 whammy in that David McKay acquired one of the P4/Can-Am 350 Group 7 cars for Chris to drive in the sports car support races.

Frank Matich served it up to him big-time in one of his Matich SR3 Repco 4.4 litre V8’s, disappointingly Matich did not cross Bass Straight for this meeting so Chris set the fastest ever lap of Longford despite not being pushed by the oh-so-fast Sydneysider.

(D Cooper)

The gleaming Ferrari Can-Am 350 Scuderia Veloce raced all too briefly throughout Australia in 1968 by Chris Amon, and Bill Brown upon the Kiwis departure back to Italy and all points beyond.

(D Cooper)

Auto-erotica.

With the 1967 Manufacturers Championship over Ferrari modified two of the P4’s, this car, chassis ‘0858’ and ‘0860’ to better compete in the Can-Am Championship and naming them ‘350 Can-Am’ to contest the prestigious series in their most important market.

The cars were lightened considerably becoming curvaceous Spiders instead of even more curvaceous Coupes! Weight was reduced from 792Kg wet to 700Kg wet, engine capacity was increased to 4176cc raising the engines power to 480bhp @ 8500rpm.

It wasn’t enough to compete with the McLaren M6A Chevs of Bruce and Denny, that story is told in this article about the Ferrari P4/Can-Am 350 and ‘0858’ specifically; https://primotipo.com/2015/04/02/ferrari-p4canam-350-0858/

Credits…

Dennis Cooper, Historic Racing Car Club of Tasmania, Bruce Wilson

Tailpiece: Look at the crowd…

(D Cooper)

Talk about missing out…

Finito…

(unattributed)

The Frank Matich/Glynn Scott Matich SR3 Repco (DNF) homes in on the Phil West/George Reynolds Scuderia Veloce Ferrari 275 GTB Competizione Clienti during the 1 September 1968 Surfers Paradise 6 Hour…

As usual, the race was won by the SV Ferrari 250LM, that year driven by the brothers Geoghegan, click on this link for an article about that car inclusive of Surfers wins; https://primotipo.com/2014/07/03/pete-geoghegan-ferrari-250lm-6321-bathurst-easter-68/

In a race a bit light on entries- and reduced from twelve to six hours, the Geoghegans won having covered 249 laps from the Bill Gates/Jim Bertram Lotus Elan, 237 and Doug Whiteford/John Roxburgh/Frank Coad Datsun 2000 on 230. Other than David McKay’s ‘Old Red Lady’ 250LM the other fancied sports-racers all retired- the Matich/Scott Matich SR3 Repco, Palmer/Brown Ferrari P4/Can-Am350 and O’Sullivan/Baltzer/Bassett Lola T70 Chev.

I hadn’t realised the significance of this Ferrari 275 GTB as one of three RHD ‘Competizione Clienti’ specification 275’s of a total 1965 production run of ten. The addition to the nose of the car appears to be a camera- I would love to see the footage if it exists?

Chassis #07545, the seventh of the ten cars, was ordered by Britain’s Maranello Concessionaires, it was intended as their Le Mans reserve car- their entries that year comprised a P2 raced by Jo Bonnier and David Piper and a 250LM steered by Mauro Bianchi and Mike Salmon, both cars failed to finish.

The GTB wasn’t completed in time for the 24 hour classic but starred as an exhibit at the 42nd International IAA Motor Show in Frankfurt that September. Maranello sold it in October 1965 to Paddy McNally, then a respected journalist later to make a motza as an equity-holder in Allsport Ltd along with Bernie The Unbelievable (Ecclestone).

SV 250LM goes under its stablemate at Surfers (unattributed)

 

Frank Gardner circa 1966, probably in Australia during the Tasman. Where folks? (Repco Collection)

The GTB featured in an Autosport feature, McNally waxed lyrical about driving the car on the fast uncluttered roads of Europe inclusive of the Col des Mosses in Switzerland. ‘Even at close to 6000 pounds…the Ferrari represents excellent value and it is quite the best car that i have ever driven.’ McNally’s enthusiasm for these machines was genuine, he later acquired #09027 and raced it at Montlhery in the Paris 1000km.

Ford race team boss Alan Mann was the next owner two years hence, along the way he returned it to the factory where the bumpers were removed and big fog-lights installed and then sold it to one of his stars- Frank Gardner.

FG used the car to commute to his race commitments across the UK and Europe- these were many and varied inclusive of Touring Cars, World Manufacturers Championship Prototypes and Sportscars, F2 and the occasional F1 event. It would be intiguing to know just how many km’s the ultra fast GT did in Frank’s short ownership.

The Australian International then brought the car to Australia in the summer of 1967/8 to take up his usual Tasman drive with Alec Mildren, that year he raced the Brabham BT23D Alfa Romeo Tipo 33 2.5 V8. He sold it to Gallaher International, a British cigarette company- sponsor of the 500 mile Bathurst enduro in 1966 and 1967, who used it as a promotional tool.

Scuderia Veloce team driver Bill Brown bought it next, it was during his ownership that Phil West/George Reynolds raced it to eighth outright and first in class (the only car in the class) at Surfers in 1968. It seems this was the machines only race in period.

Melbourne motor racing entrepreneur/hill-climber Jim Abbott was the next owner, I dare say he gave it a run up Lakeland once or twice on the way to its garage at home- after his death it passed to Daryl Rigg and then to Ray Delaney who owned it for seven or so years using the car extensively. So too did Max Lane including contesting Targa Tasmania in 1993- the car left Australia many years ago as the global investment grade commodity it is.

#07545 in recent years (Talacrest)

Competizione 275 GTB’s…

The competition variants of one of Ferrari’s most sought after Grand Turismo’s was born of Enzo’s swifty in attempting to homologate his 1963 250P sports-prototype ‘in drag’- the 250LM as a GT car to replace the revered GTO. The FIA could see  the 3.3 litre LM- a larger capacity 250P with a roof for what it was and refused to homologate it.

Even as a GT the 250LM won Le Mans of course. Masten Gregory and Jochen Rindt flogged their NART entry to death- but not quite and won in 1965 after the more fancied Ferrari P2 and Ford GT40 Mk2 prototypes fell by the wayside with all manner of problems.

As a consequence, needing a GT racer, Ferrari set to modifying the just released in 1964 GTB whose baseline specifications included a sophisticated ‘Tipo 563’ chassis, independent suspension front and rear, aerodynamic bodywork, four-wheel disc brakes, five-speed rear mounted transaxle and the well proven ‘Tipo 213’ Colombo V12- in this car SOHC, two-valve and 3.3 litres (3286cc- 77 x 58.8mm bore and stroke) in capacity.

275GTB prototype and first car built #06003 during the 1966 Monte Carlo Rally crewed by Giorgio Pianta and Roberto Lippi, DNF driveline (unattributed)

Depending upon your source there are either three or four distinct series or phases of build of competition 275’s.

The first are the relatively mild modifications to chassis #06003 and #06021.

#06003 is the prototype, very first 275GTB built in 1964, it was retained by the factory for testing purposes throughout 1965, then modified and entered in the 1966 Monte Carlo Rally. #06021- is ‘the third GTB built and the prototype for the 1965 customer competition cars’ according to Peter Sachs who owned it twice. Its first custodian was a Roman, Antonio Maglione who contested at least four Hillclimb events in it in June/July 1965 having acquired it that April.

The second group of three works cars (plus a fourth built to this spec in 1966) designated ‘Competition Speciale’ were extensively modified by a team led by Mauro Forghieri with lightweight tube frames based on the standard Tipo 563 chassis.

The motors were six-Weber carb, dry-sumped Tipo 213 engines to 250LM spec giving 290-305 bhp and had 330 LM Berlinetta style noses with an air-scoop atop the long bonnets.

Other modifications included holes in interior panels, plexiglass windows and the use of magnesium castings for some engine and transmission parts. These cars, also designated 275 GTB/C Speciale, the bodies of which were of course designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti are said by some to be the most direct successors to the 250GTO.

After a DNF at Targa and third in class at the Nürburgring 1000km #06885 was sold by Scuderia Ferrari to Ecurie Francorchamps who raced it at Le Mans in 1965 achieving first in class and third outright- stunning for a GT. The reputation of these ‘275 GTB/C’s was underway.

Ferrari 275 GTB cutaway, specifications as per text (unattributed)

 

Scuderia Veloce line up before the 1968 Surfers 6 hour with Pete Geoghegan’s stout frame back to us. The #17 Ferrari Can-Am 350 DNF in the hands of Jim Palmer and Bill Brown. The West/Reynolds GTB is alongside and victorious Leo and Pete Geoghegan 250LM to the left (Rod MacKenzie)

Gardner’s #07545 was one of ten cars designated 275 ‘Competizione Clienti’ or ‘GTB/C Series 1′, which were built as dual purpose customer road/racers between May and August 1965- they were constructed in parallel with the works cars mentioned above and delivered only to privateers.

The specifications of this batch, very close to production cars included short nose bodies and six Weber DCN3 carbs, rather than the standard three, feeding essentially a standard wet sump Tipo 213 engine. The fuel tank was 140 litres rather than the standard 94 litre jobbie, the spare sat vertically aft of the tank. A higher rear shelf is a visual difference with three air vents in each rear guard a signal of menace. No two cars were identical but most had lightweight alloy bodies.

The final run of twelve cars, the ‘9000 series chassis’ were super-trick, schmick jiggers and are variously described as ‘275 GTB Berlinetta Competizione’ or ‘275 GTB/C’.

They have lightweight long-nose bodies built by Scaglietti which were half the thickness of the 250GTO’s and a specially designed steel and aluminium Tipo 590A chassis which was lighter and stiffer than the standard unit. The suspension and hubs were reinforced, clutch upgraded and a different steering box fitted.

The dry sumped Tipo 213 V12- which allowed the engine to be mounted lower in the frame, was tuned to 250LM specifications with some Electron components incorporated- sump, cam cover, timing chain casing and bell-housing- power was circa 275-282bhp @ 7700rpm. The three big Weber 40 DF13 carbs were a design unique to the car and fitted due to a clerical stuff up by Ferrari who had not homologated the six-carb Weber option.

Out and out racers, these were the only cars referred to by the factory as 275 GTB/C and were the last competition GT’s fettled in Maranello- the Daytona GTB/4 racers were modified in Modena.

Le Mans Esses 1967. The second placed Ferrari P4 of Scarfiotti/Parkes ahead of eleventh placed and first in class Filipinetti Ferrari 275GTB/C #09079 driven by Steinemann/Spoerry (LAT)

 

Ray Delaney in GTB #07545 at Amaroo Park, Sydney in 1981

Credits…

Jaguar Magazine, Repco Collection via Nigel Tait, Rod MacKenzie, Ray Delaney, Talacrest, barchetta.cc, LAT, Stephen Dalton

Tailpiece: 1968 Surfers 6 Hour…

(unattributed)

Borrani’s at the front and Campagnolo’s up the back, ain’t she sweet…

Finito…