Posts Tagged ‘Alan Jones’



1981 Williams FW07D Ford (P D’Alessio)

I’d forgotten about the speed of Patrick Head’s Williams 6-wheelers and what a serious attempt they were to address the teams position in 1981/82. And the rule changes to ban them such was their apparent speed…

Williams couldaa-wouldaa-shouldaa won World Titles in 1979 and 1981 to go with the ‘Jones Boys’ win in 1980.

In ’79 the ground-effect FW07 arrived late and took a while to find the reliability to go with its speed apparent from the start. In 1981 team orders and more ‘cooperation’ between Jones and Reutemann would have secured a title for one of them instead of ‘none’ of them.

The two ‘numero-unos’ caper seldom works does it? I am a Buddhist in some ways but I still love the way ole AJ totally crushed Lole at Vegas in that last round ’81 championship showdown. Sheer force of will and balls. Attributes the ebullient, combative Balwyn Boy had in spades.

By late 1981 the turbo teams were finding reliability to go with their speed. Renault only missed out on the ’81 title because of unreliability, Ferrari were new to the turbo game but the engine was great even if the chassis was not. Brabham had formed a partnership with BMW. The best of the Cosworth runners was the McLaren MP4, which, with the very first carbon-fibre chassis was putting to the road all the venerable DFV had to offer. Maranello unsurprisingly knocked back William’s request for a customer Ferrari V6 turbo.

What to do was the question the Didcot hierachy faced as the FW07 series of cars were at the end of their development cycle?


Alan Jones, Wlliams FW07D Ford, referred to as FW07E also, Donington Park, November 1981 (Sutton)

To make things worse, Alan Jones made a very late call to quit GP racing and become a farmer. He bought a property at Glenburn, in the Kinglake/Yea area of Victoria forcing the Williams team to shop around on the second-hand driver market. The population difference of 250 people in Glenburn and greater London’s many millions is a change in domicile of some scale! Frank and Patrick eventually signed Keke Rosberg to partner Carlos Reutemann. It turned out to be rather a good choice.

Patrick Head set upon two design paths in parallel; the FW07 replacement ‘FW08’ and a six-wheeler project. By mixing the two projects, Head accounted for the six-wheeled concept in the FW08 design. The FW08’s wheelbase was kept short to accommodate the addition of four-wheel-rear-drive, its short wheelbase is partially the explanation of FW08’s stubby looks.

What follows is a truncated version of a great 8W: Forix article on six-wheelers, click on the link at the end of this article for an excellent summary of six-wheelers starting with the 1948 Pat Clancy Special and finishing with the 1982 Williams FW08D. In addition I have drawn on the recollections of the Williams six-wheeler designer, Frank Dernie in a MotorSport article.

The Williams six-wheel configuration would be four smaller driven wheels at the back in a direct effort to improve straightline speed by getting rid of the big aerodynamically inefficient rear tyres and improve traction out of corners due to the increased rubber contact. A bonus was to allow the free flow of air along the sidepods all the way to the rear axle of the car.

‘As ground effects were permitted within the wheelbase of the car, Head cunningly interpreted this rule as being from front axle to the most rearward axle! In Head’s mind, these would be ground effects perfection. The leading rear axle was placed four inches ahead of its original place, with the driveshafts angled to cope. The most rearward axle was driven by an additional final drive added on the back of the transmission. Hewland provided assistance on the gearbox, using vital experience gained from Roy Lane’s March 2-4-0 hillclimber’ which you will recall was also two wheels up front and four down the back.

Jones briefly tested the car at Donington Park in November 1981 shortly after winning at Las Vegas, but still decided against continuing his GP career. Its said the weather was so cold in Leicestershire that day that Jones had to pour hot water on his Jaguar door locks to get into his car. It’s not that the concept of the six-wheeler was poor, simply that AJ needed a break.

He returned to Australia to race Formula Pacific and Sportscars but was back to Grand Prix racing soon enough, his decision to opt for the bucolic pleasures of country life in Australia was premature.

‘In November 1981, at a cool but sunny Paul Ricard Keke Rosberg climbed aboard the six-wheeled FW07 hack, which for reference purposes we shall call the FW07E, as its reported name (‘FW07D’) later became the designation for the regular 1982 FW07.

Reports in Autosprint magazine led everyone to believe that Keke’s times at Ricard were unusually fast indeed, although many warned not to read too much into winter testing times. However, Alain Prost’s lap record of 1.04.5 had been set on October 26, just two weeks before Keke and his FW07D/E lowered it to 1.04.3 on November 7.

Jonathan Palmer also tested the car at Croix-en-Ternois in the North of France to see what its performance would be like on a tight and twisty track, and matched the times set by the regular FW07C.

Eventually though, the FW07D/E wasn’t used in racing as the team found a major obstacle to its ‘perfect’ ground effects – the lower wishbones of the rear suspension.

So Head decided on incorporating this dilemma into the design of the FW08, which as stated above was predesigned to accommodate six wheels. The FW08 solution used fixed-length driveshafts that would be used as lateral lower location members as well, thus freeing the underwing tunnels from any obstruction’.


Williams FW08 Ford 1982: Aluminium honeycomb monocoque chassis, wishbone and rocker pullrod suspension at front and wisbones and rockers at rear, coil spring dampers, Ford Cosworth 3 litre DFV V8- about 490 bhp @ 10750 rpm in ’82 spec, Hewland FGA400 5 speed box (P D’Alessio)

1982 Season…

‘Buoyed by the performance of the latest FW07 regular development, the FW07D, the team started the season with this car, ‘Lole’ immediately taking second after the super-license affair at Kyalami, with Rosberg fifth.

While the politics continued unabated in Brazil, Williams were confronted by Reutemann’s shock retirement from racing but lifted by Rosberg’s strong second place at Long Beach, yet still behind Niki Lauda in McLaren’s miracle chassis.

The Imola boycott allowed the team to prepare two FW08s for Zolder where there was more drama in store for the Grand Prix community. With the Renaults faltering yet again, Keke grabbed another second place, this time following home John Watson in the other MP4/1’.

‘In the following races Rosberg and new team mate Derek Daly continued to be beaten by the McLaren and the Brabham BT49D, while the turbo-engined Brabham won its first race.


Williams Team FW08’s in the Detroit paddock June 1982 Derek Daly 5th behind his car. Rosberg was 4th, the race won by the carbon-fibre McLaren MP4 Ford of John Watson (unattributed)

In France, turbos finished one-two-three-four.

Obviously unaware of the final Championship result, the Williams team then pressed on with its six-wheeler project and during the summer of 1982 a new car surfaced.

This time an adapted FW08-01 codenamed FW08D, hit the Donington Park track. Its four wheel drive times were stunning. In fact, they were so good that the FIA issued their 1983 regulations including a clause that outlawed six-wheelers and four-wheel drive’.

Frank Dernie spoke of his FW08 six-wheeler design in MotorSport.

‘The biggest problem with traditional ground-effect cars is that the downforce is generated a very long  way forward so you need a draggy rear wing to balance it. The big plus with the six-wheeler was that its side-pods ran comfortably inside the narrow rear tyres, right to the back.’

‘I managed a sufficiently rearward centre of pressure, without too much loss of the underbody, to do away with wings; the car had a slotted-flap type underbody, part of it around the exhaust, part of it in the normal place. I couldn’t have done that with a four-wheeled car. When skirts have to stop ahead of the rear tyres, you’re knackered’.

‘The lift to drag ratio of FW08 was 8.2, and the FW08B six-wheeler was not much more…But the final quarter scale model of the six-wheeler that would have gone into production had a lift to drag of 13 point something’. With neither front nor rear wing, any necessary trimming was to be supplied by a Gurney type flap at the bodywork’s rear’.


Keke Rosberg aboard FW08D in 1982 (LAT)

Keke Rosberg, Jacques Laffitte, Jonathon Palmer and Tony Trimmer all tested FW08B as late as October 1982.

‘It was quite progressive’ said Palmer. ‘It was great fun to throw around, to get a bit sideways, because instead of one wheel losing grip, and, therefore losing 50% of your grip, if one wheel lost grip you still had three others giving you some grip’. The car showed promise on all types of track from the high speed sweeps of Silverstone to the twists of Croix en-Ternois.

Dernie again ‘Patrick was sure that the only limitation would be, with four driven wheels pointing straight ahead, masses of power understeer. But after only a few laps of ‘Croix, Laffitte admitted he had forgotten it was a six-wheeler’.


Jolly Jacques aboard FW08D at Crois en-Ternois in 1982 (unattributed)

‘If you get the weight distribution right for the tyres and make sure the aero is consistent, there is no reason why it wouldn’t feel like any normal racing car. To get the ultimate from it, though, tyres  specific to the rear would have been required. At that time however, we were just running six fronts’.

In a busy time for Williams GP Engineering Dernie was actively assessing active suspension, Rosberg was stringing together a consistent run in one of F1 nuttiest seasons, FW was courting Honda as an engine provider and as a result the six-wheeler slipped down the priority list.

‘We didn’t expect it to be banned. Though we thought that maybe it would be after everyone saw how quick it was’.

‘We didn’t have sufficient time or money to bring it to fruition. We only had one Hewland gearbox, for example. Its casing was completely different because the suspension mounts were different. The gear linkage was unique too. We would have to have made lots of new bits before racing it, and inevitably it was going to be a heavier than a normal car’.


Sibling similarity between four and six wheelers clear in this Monaco 1982 shot of Rosberg’s FW08, DNF collision. Ricardo Patrese won in a Brabham BT49 Ford (unattributed)

Williams’ efforts had come to nought. And with Keke suddenly picking up one useful placing after the other – outpacing the unreliable McLarens in the process – and taking his debut win at Dijon, the Didcot team stopped having reasons for arguing too strongly with the FIA. And they had their negotiations with Honda going on anyway.

8W:Forix ‘Joining them – as Lotus had done, as McLaren would ultimately do – instead of beating them became the new motto for the new Formula 1 era. It had no place for six-wheelers, just as it refused four-wheel driven turbine cars. Many years later, at the 1995 Festival of Speed, the Williams FW08D turned out one more time in the hands of Jonathan Palmer. On the hill at Goodwood it showed why it was outlawed before it got the chance to show it was a winner. The doctor comfortably set an FTD that was only narrowly beaten by Nick Heidfeld four years later, in a pukka 1998 McLaren’.

‘Today the answer to the question is simple again. ‘What does a racing car look like?’ It’s got four wheels and a steering wheel, with the engine in the back driving the rear wheels. Apparently, the 21st century is no time for playing around in another ballpark. Or it must be in The Thunderbirds.’

The last sentence says everything that is wrong about modern F1 of course- the sameness of the cars as a consequence of rules which are way too prescriptive.


FW08D, Paul Ricard 1982- four driven wheels. This shot shows just how long and far back those ground effect tunnels extend! (unattributed)


MotorSport March 2017

 Photo Credits…

Paulo D’Alessio, Sutton, Pinterest, LAT, F1 Fanatic

Etcetera: Williams FW08D Ford Goodwood 2012…


Top rear, rear! suspension shot- beautiful magnesium upright, lower wishbone, top rocker, G/E tunnel, fixed skirt, wonderful (F1 Fanatic)

Tailpiece: Williams FW08B Ford 1982- F1’s last six-wheeler, last 4WD…





Jones in the Lola THL1 Hart, Monaco 1986, Q18 and DNF after a collision on lap 2. Patrick Tambay’s performance was perhaps more indicative of the cars speed, Q8 but again DNF after an accident. Prost won in a McLaren MP4/2C TAG Porsche (Getty)

Alan Jones in his Lola THL1 Hart at Monaco during practice on May 10 1986…

Just looking these pictures, note the Ford logo on the side of the cockpit, reminded me of the vexed, too soon launched Ford Cosworth GBA 1.5 V6 twin-turbo.

Jones and Tambay didn’t race the Ford engine in ’86, they contested the title with Brian Hart’s Hart 415T, 4 cylinder engine whilst GBA development continued at Cosworths. Best results for the year were a 4th and 5th in Austria in a sea of DNF’s. The Haas team then withdrew from F1, the GBA program torch carried forward by Benetton but not for too long…


The tiny Ford Cosworth GBA; 1497cc, 120 degree DOHC, 4 valve V6 twin-KKK-turbo, circa 750bhp, depending on month and spec, engine during the British GP weekend, Brands Hatch 1986 (Schlegelmilch)

That Brian Hart built an F1 engine is an accident of history. It was an evolution of the relationship he had with the Toleman Team who won the European F2 Championship in 1980 (Brian Henton won the drivers title) with his superb 2 litre 420R 4 cylinder engine (below) in the back of Rory Byrne’s TG280 ground effects chassis.


The 420R engine cutaway, note belt driven camshafts, engine extremely compact and beautifully packaged, an evolution of his FVA and BDA knowledge including his design/development of the alloy 2 litre BDG block (John Way)


The 420R engine has a bore/stroke of 93.5 mm x 72.6 mm, a capacity of 1994 cc and was the result of a long development path starting with Hart’s race preparation of FVA’s in 1969. Designed in house, blocks and heads came from Stirling Metals with the machining done at Harts. Gordon Allen produced the cranks, Hart did his own cams and developed the pistons with Mahle in Germany. Lucas provided the fuel injection. The engine developed 305 bhp @ 9,500 rpm with safe bursts to just over 10,000 rpm.


Toleman TG280 Hart cutaway, 1980 Euro F2 championship winner in Brian Henton’s hands with Derek Warwick fidhting him all the way in the sister car. Aluminium ground effects monocoque chassis, Hart 420R engine, Hewland FT200 5 speed transaxle. In 1981 Lola built customer versions of this design (Alenso)

Ted Toleman’s wealth derived  from building up the UK’s largest car transport business, his ambition extended to graduation from F2 to F1. Rory Byrne designed what became the TG181 chassis which team manager Alex Hawkridge told Brian would either carry a turbo-charged version of the 420R or Lancia’s turbo 1.4 which was doing service in their sports-racer at the time. So Brian set to with the challenge!


Brian Hart shows journalist Maurice Hamilton his handiwork in March 1982. Early test of the turbo-charged 415T engine. Look at that early turbo/inlet manifold (Hamilton)

‘I had never even seen a turbocharger,’ Hart claims, ‘and I didn’t understand intercooling’. His engine was the first British turbo Fl engine and the TG181 was as ‘big and butch’ as the TG280 was ‘nimble and slinky’. Packaging of these early turbo-cars was a big challenge even with the resources of Ferrari whose 1981 126CK was no picture of elegance either.

The first beautifully integrated turbo was John Barnard’s 1984 McLaren MP4/2 TAG Porsche largely because he prescribed very thoroughly the packaging of his engine spec to Porsche to ensure the needs of his chassis, particularly its aerodynamic effectiveness were not compromised by the engine and its ancillaries inclusive of radiators and intercoolers.


Monobloc all alloy Hart 415T, note belt driven cam drive and atypical Holset turbo, spec of engine as per text (John Way)

The first iteration of the 415T had a bore and stroke of 89.2mm X 60mm and a capacity of 1499cc. With a compression ratio of 6.7:1 and single KKK turbo-charger the engine developed circa 557bhp at 9500rpm compared to its competitors; normally aspirated Cosworth DFV circa 500bhp and Matra V12 510. The turbos were the Renault V6 540, Ferrari V6 560 and BMW in-line 4 557bhp.

The 415T engine was down on power and prone to head-gasket failure, drivers Brian Henton and Derek Warwick who had enjoyed so much Hart F2 success in 1980 repeatedly failed to qualify.

Hart was under lots of pressure and there was heavy tension between him and Byrne noting the shortcomings of the latters chassis. Derek Warwick later observed that Brian was a great engineer, a great person and always under-financed. And a pretty handy driver in his day…


Works Lotus F2 driver in 1964, here at Montlhery, Lotus 32 Ford Cosworth SCA. Brian was 4th behind Brabham, Stewart in the other Ron Harris entry and Jo Schlesser. Grand Prix de L’ile de France, 27 September 1964. Equal 13th in the Euro F2 Championship that year (Viollet)

Brian Hart raced with success, he dominated the 1172cc Clubmans formula and later raced in FJ, its successor F3 and in F2 during its most competitive period with grids full of ‘graded’, moonlighting GP drivers.

He raced the brilliant Mike Costin designed Protos 16 powered by a Hart prepped Cosworth FVA, a highlight setting fastest lap and finishing second to Frank Gardner’s works Brabham BT23 FVA in the slip-streaming blast title qualifier at Hockenheim in 1967. He was 11th in the Euro F2 Championship that year and 14th in 1968 driving a Merlyn Mk12 and Brabham BT23C both FVA powered .


Kurt Ahrens ahead of teammate Brian Hart in sensational timber monocoque Protos 16 Ford FVA F2 cars during the ’67 German GP won by Denny Hulme’s Brabham BT24 Repco. Brian finished the race but was unclassified, F2 class won by Jack Oliver’s Lotus 48 FVA (unattributed)

He gradually phased from driving into building and developing race engines forming Brian Hart Engines in Harlow, Essex in 1969 gaining much success preparing and tuning FVA’s for racing and BDA’s for rallying. Ronnie Peterson won the Euro F2 championship in 1971 with a Hart prepared FVA (March 711M) and Mike Hailwood in 1972 with an 1850cc BDA. (Surtees TS10)

Brian originally trained at De Havilland Aircraft, then worked for Cosworths when they were building/developing the 1600cc Ford FVA F2 engine, the precursor to the great DFV in the initial 1966/7 partnership between Cosworth and Ford.

A turning point with the 415T was when Hart decided to build the engine as a monobloc, that is no separate head joint to be sealed against coolant, boost pressure and combustion leaks; ‘I decided to cast the head and block as one and in about a fortnight we gained 130bhp. Hart also used British Holset turbo-chargers and benefitted from their flexibility and willingness to develop their products to suit the engine. ‘And the new car (1982 TG183) was 90 per cent better’ Hart quipped.

The much improved TG183B scored 10 championship points in ’83. In ’84 F1 novice Ayrton Senna almost won at Monaco in the quicker TG184. Hart recalled working with the young champion ‘He was astonishing. No man until Schumacher could motivate a team like Ayrton. I asked him to remember the boost reading on one corner per lap, and he came back after a single lap with all the readings for every corner in his head. It was a new level of participation.’


Ayrton Senna in the dry during Monaco 1984 practice, this overhead shot shows the innovative aero approach of Rory Byrne. Car a bit fugly but fast albeit not reliable enough, Toleman TG183B. The famous race was wet, it started 45 minutes late, the two Renaults collided thru no fault of their own on lap 1 giving Patrick Tambay a broken leg, setting the tone of the race. The chequered flag was waved early by (factory Porsche 956 driver) Clerk of Course Jacky Ickx, without consulting the Race Stewards, on lap 31 giving the Porsche powered Prost a win in his McLaren MP4/2 TAG from Senna who was chasing him down. Behind him Stefan Bellof was catching Ayrton hand over fist in his Tyrrell, having started the only normally aspirated car in the race from the back of the grid.To this day enthusiasts debate the race outcome had it gone a few more laps let alone the full distance, 76 laps. A collision between Senna and Prost giving Stefan the win or a collision between Senna and Bellof giving Prost the win my two potential outcomes! Bellof’s podium was taken off him later in the season as the Tyrrell was found to be underweight by the FIA. Read a report of this event, the twists and turns from Martin Brundle’s practice crash to Tyrrell’s exclusion months later amazing. The race was notable for the fine delicacy of control these two tigers (Senna and Bellof) exhibited in such difficult conditions on the most unforgiving circuit so early in their careers, greatness apparent to say the least, unfulfilled, sadly, in Bellof’s case of course (unattributed)

In 1985 development was hamstrung early in the year when the team could not test as they had no tyre contract, this problem was solved when they bought the Spirit teams contract when they withdrew from F1. By this stage with Holset turbo, Hart/ERA digital engine management and Marelli fuel injection at 2.5 atmospheres of boost the engine developed about 740bhp at 10,500rpm.

A fantastic moment was when the car qualified on pole in the German GP after second session times were impacted by rain. The engine was estimated to be giving about 825bhp in qualifying spec with about 730 in race spec but reliability to a large extent had been lost.


Teo Fabi at Brands Hatch in the Toleman TG185 Hart during the ’85 British GP, DNF transmission from grid 9. Prost won in a McLaren MP4/2B TAG Porsche. Look at how neat the packaging of this car is compared with the earlier Tolemans, Rory Byrne and Brian Hart made great strides in development of both chassis and engines. The great shame is that none of Hart’s customers were ‘flush enough’ to fund a development program of Hart’s 415T to get the mix of power/reliability needed. Hart probably also shot himself in the foot by taking on more teams than he really had the resources to service properly. As you can see hindsight is a great strength of mine! (Fosh)

The Toleman team was acquired by Benetton later in 1985, who used BMW engines. It was a relief for Hart who struggled with small budgets and too many customers (Spirit, RAM and Beatrice-Lola) ‘I had my arm twisted to do other teams. Toleman simply couldn’t fund the development. I once told Paul Rosche (BMW’s engine guru) what we had to spend, and he said they spent that on blocks alone’ Hart recalled in a MotorSport interview.

Hart 415T; aluminium 4 cylinder monobloc weighing about 140Kg. Belt driven DOHC, 4 valve, fuel injected, intercooled and single Holset turbocharger 1459cc (bore/stroke 88X61.55mm). Between 650-825bhp at 10500 rpm depending upon spec and year.


Bennetton B187 Ford GBA 1.5 V6 twin-turbo (unattributed)

Going back to the Ford GBA engine early in the article, Benetton raced the ‘works’ Ford GBA’s with a modicum more success in 1987, 5th in the constructors championship won by Williams Honda the best result that year a 3rd in Adelaide for Thierry Boutsen at the seasons end.

Into 1988 and rule changes tipped the balance a little more in favour of normally aspirated engines so Benetton raced the B188 powered by the 3.5 litre V8 Ford Cosworth DFR finishing 3rd in the manufacturers championship behind McLaren and Ferrari; Ford competitiveness was returning and the GBA was placed on the shelf a victim of rule changes and being a little too late to the turbo-party…


MotorSport, Doug Nye ‘History of The Grand Prix Car’, Maurice Hamilton, Anthony Fosh, Rainer Schlegelmilch, Pascal Rondeau, John Way, 8W Forix, Alenso, Roger Viollet

Tailpiece: Brian Hart with his 830 V8 engine, it was fitted to the Footwork chassis’, 1996 Spanish Grand Prix…


After working on the development of the Ford Cosworth  DFR in the early 1990’s Hart built the 72 degree 3.5 litre V10 ‘1035’ which was used by Jordan with successful results in 1993. For the 3 litre formula in 1995 he ‘chopped a couple of cylinders off’, maintaining the 72 degree Vee angle to create the ultra compact ‘830’ V8.

Known fondly as ‘Jam Tart’, this immensely popular member of the F1 paddock died too young at 77 in 2014.



James Hunt dives for the inside line in his March 713S Ford, AJ and his Brabham BT28 Ford has left a gap way bigger than he ever did when they slugged it out in GP racing…

It’s 1971, the BRSCC MCD Shell Super Oil British F3 Championship at Brands Hatch on 1 March 1971 and both drivers are trying hard to jump up to the next level, the road for Hunt would be easier than Jones, James a coming star with the Hesketh March 731 in 1973 and Jones an F1 ‘occasional’ from 1974.

The ‘facts’ are from the photo caption, the cars and drivers are correct but the date/Brands event don’t accord with the ‘F2 Register’ record of that event, my F3 race resource. It appears AJ didn’t race with #69, a number with obvious appeal to him at all during ’71.

One for the British F3 historians amongst you!


Grand Prix Photos

stan longford

Wonderful shot of Stan Jones winning the 1959 Australian Grand Prix. Tannery Corner, Longford, Tasmania. Maserati 250F (B Dunstan via Ellis French)

The Ascaris’, Jones’, Hills’ and Villeneuves’…

When Alan Jones won the 1980 Australian Grand Prix at Calder, he and his father Stan joined the Ascaris as the only father/son combination to win their home Grands’ Prix.

Antonio Ascari won the 1924 Italian Grand Prix in an Alfa and his son Alberto won it in 1949, 1951 and 1952 for Ferrari.

Stan won the 1959 AGP at Longford in his Maserati 250F, the last AGP won by a front engined car.

Graham and Damon Hill both contested the British Grand Prix, Damon winning in 1994 aboard a Williams Renault, whilst Graham came close he never had a hometown win. His luck in the UK as bad as it was good in Monaco where he won five times!

Similarly, Gilles and Jacques Villeneuve both contested the Canadian Grand Prix but only Gilles took a win, for Ferrari in 1978.

Sadly, all four fathers had one thing in common, they all died before their sons achieved Grand Prix success. Alberto and Gilles in testing/race accidents, Graham in the light aircraft he was piloting together with his team and Stan of natural causes at the very young age of 49.


Like so many of my articles, the one on Stan started with a photo, the one above at Longford. I figured the article would be short but the more I dug, and there is not a lot of information available on Jones, the more interested I became in him and the series of Maybach cars which were such an important part of his career.

So, it’s ended up rather long! but I hope of interest to some.

I leaned heavily for the information on the Maybach phase on Malcolm Prestons’ great book ‘From Maybach to Holden’, sadly, Malcolm died a month or so ago. He was very kind and helpful to me with the article on John McCormacks’ McLaren M23, that article in many ways the inspiration for starting this blog, so I dedicate this article to him. RIP Malcolm Preston.

Stan Jones…

stan 2

Famous shot of Stan Jones shaking hands with Otto Stone, his engineer after the 1959 Longford AGP victory in his Maserati 250F. Alan is 12 in this shot, John Sawyer, the other technician wears the flat cap…Stan a justifiably happy-chappy after so many years trying to win this event! (Unattributed)

Much has been written about Alan of course but not so much about Stan, one of the great drivers and characters of Australian motor racing in the immediate post war years until the dawn of the 1960’s.

He was raised in Warrandyte, then a rural hamlet 24Km north-east of Melbourne, still semi-rural now, by his mother and grandfather. He served in the Australian Armed Forces based in Darwin during World War 2. He married Alma O’Brien circa 1940, Alan was born on November 2 1946.

Stan commenced motorsport after being encouraged by Otto Stone, a racer and engineer who would later make a great contribution to his success as an elite driver. He competed in his MGTC at Rob Roy Hillclimb, at Christmas Hills, not far from where he grew up in 1948.

Stan was soon a keen competitor in all forms of the sport including trials twice winning the Cohen Trophy awarded to the best trials driver of the year by the Light Car Club of Australia.

His MGTC was supercharged, as so many of them were, his first circuit meeting was at Fishermans Bend, Melbourne in late 1949. He did well, finishing seventh against more experienced opposition. In need for more speed, he bought an HRG chassis to which a local monoposto body was fitted, achieving success with the car  in 1949 and 1950. His first road racing event was at Woodside, in the Adelaide Hills, he finished 2nd in the ‘Onkaparinga Class handicap’ in November 1949. ‘Australian Motor Sports’ reported that it was the first appearance of one of the new production monoposto racing HRG 1500’s.’

In 1951 he also bought an Allard J2.

These faster cars were funded by ‘Superior Cars’ a dealership he opened in Richmond, yards in Coburg and South Yarra followed, northern and inner eastern Melbourne suburbs respectively.

Stan Jones Allard

Jones Allard J2 in the Bathurst paddock, 1951. (Ray Eldershaw Collection)

Charlie Dean, Repco and Maybach…

Maybach Carlton

Charlie testing Maybach circa 1950 on the road, in the grounds of ‘Willsmere’ the hospital for mental illnesses in Kew not far from Charlies home. His other testing venue was’Princes Pard Drive’ behind the Melbourne General Cemetery in North Carlton. This ‘track’ was conveniently close to Repco Research in Sydney Road, Brunswick. What a super car it was/is! (Dacre Stubbs Collection)

The turning point in Stans’ career was the association with Charlie Dean, the ‘Maybach’ racers which Dean built and the ‘Skunkworks’ at Repco, which continued to develop the car and its successors after Jones acquired it.

Charlie’s business named ‘Replex’, manufactured large industrial transformers. He became involved in the Australian Motorsports Club, and using his wartime knowledge of sophisticated German engines, sought a suitable motor to form the basis of a special. A friend who operated a war surplus wrecking yard was briefed and Charlie was soon the owner of a ‘Demag’ half-track armoured personnel carrier. Critically, it was powered by a Maybach 6 cylinder 3.8 litre SOHC, cross flow engine. The block was cast-iron, the head aluminium, the crank ran on 8 main bearings, and in standard form the engine produced 100bhp at 2800rpm but the engines performance potential was clear to Dean.

Initial modifications involved fitment of twin Amal carbs to a fabricated manifold, increasing the compression ratio to 8:1 by planing the head, fitment of a Vertex Magneto and a re-ground cam to increase valve lift and duration.

At about the time Dean started to build ‘Maybach 1’, he sold his business to Repco, being retained to run it, this gave him both time for his hobby and access to Repco’s resources…

The engine was fitted into a tubular chassis, the basis of which was 2 4 inch diameter 10 guage mild steel tubes to the front of which was mounted suspension mounting framework. Front suspension comprised a transverse leaf spring with suspension arms and stub axles from a 1937 Studebaker Commander. Rear suspension was of conventional semi elliptic leaf springs, Luvax lever-arm shocks were used. A Fiat 525 gearbox drove an open prop-shaft to a Lancia Lambda 7th series rear axle. A Jeep steering box was used.

Standard Studebaker brakes and wheels were used at the front, and Lancia brakes, hubs and wheels at the rear.

It was a quick sports car and was soon developed further for competition use, Charlie debuting it at Rob Roy Hillclimb in 1947.

The car was clothed in a metal body built by fellow Repco Engineer Frank Hallam, the body made from surplus metal ‘Kittyhawk’ aircraft fuel belly-tanks. (made by Ford)

Charlie raced the car in the 1948 AGP at Point Cook, an ex-RAAF base in Melbournes’ inner West. He retired on lap 12 from magneto failure in a race of attrition in searing heat, victory going to Frank Pratts’ BMW 328. ( in those days the AGP was Formule Libre and handicaps were applied)

Maybach Rob Roy

Charlie Dean with Jack Joyce as ballast competing at Rob Roy Hillclimb, Christmas Hills, outer Melbourne in March 1949. Maybach 1 ‘evolution B’ in the cars never ending developmental cycle. (Dacre Stubbs Collection)

The development of Maybach was constant and ongoing, the ‘program’ having strong Repco support due to its promotional value and development of its engineers. In 1950 Dean was appointed to head up a Research Centre for the Repco Group, located at the ex-Replex premises at 50 Sydney Road, Brunswick…from acorns do great oaks grow.

In June 1951 Jones, looking for an outright class winning car, bought the car for a nominal sum, the Repco involvement continued with the cars preparation, development and use by Repco for product development and testing. The car was engineered at Repco Research. Deans business and family commitments had made ongoing motor sport participation difficult. Jones lived in the Melbourne eastern suburb of Balwyn, in Yongala Road, not far from Dean’s home in Kew so communication was easy despite the lack of email and iphones…

By the time Stan bought ‘Maybach 1 Series 3’ the body was still a 2 seater. 3 feet of rear chassis rails had been removed from the original, it had rear axle mounted trailing quarter elliptics with radius rods.The engine was 4.2 litres and used 3 2 3/16 inch SU carbs, had a compression ratio of 9:1, and a reliable (sic) Lucas magneto. After the SU’s were fitted the engine developed 200bhp @5000rpm. Tyres were 16×6.50 touring type.

A 1922 American truck ‘Power Lock’ ‘slippery diff’ was adapted in the Lancia housing which was modified to suit. The brakes had also been changed substantially using 16 inch/ 14 inch drums front/rear.

Racing Maybach…

southport 1954

Doug Whitefords’ Lago Talbot leads Jones’ Maybach  onto the main straight at Woodside in October 1951, Whiteford won the race, Stan second. Just look at the nature of this road circuit; telephone poles, fence posts, railway crossing etc. A tragic accident in a motor-cycle handicap race where an early starter completed his first lap before the scratchmen had gotten away, killing 2 people in the starting area caused the ban on racing on public roads in South Australia (Clem Smith via Ray Bell)

Stans’ first race in the car was at Gawler, South Australia, the main scratch race setting the pattern for the season with Jones and Doug Whiteford in the Lago Talbot fierce rivals, the two cars passing and repassing before Whieford won the event.

Jones then raced the car at Bathurst in October 1951, winning a 3 lap scratch race but finishing second to Whitefords Talbot-Lago in the 50 lap handicap. The following week Jones again finished second to Whiteford at Woodside, a road circuit in the Onkaparinga Valley in the Adelaide Hills.

ralt and mybach

Stans’ Maybach chasing Ron Tauranacs’ Ralt Jap through Parramatta Park, Sydney on 28 January 1952. You can see the energy being expended by the drivers in getting everything from the two, dissimilar cars. (Unattributed)

He adapted to the car quickly and well having progressed from a low powered road going TC to one of the fastest cars in the country in less than 3 years, his money allowed it but he still had to extract all the car had to offer. Which he did from the start.

He next raced the car at the Ballarat Airstrip in rural Victoria, winning both the Victoria and Ballarat Trophies from Lex Davisons Alfa P3.

Maybach Rob Roy

Maybach 1 at rest. Rob Roy Hillclimb early 50’s. (unattributed)

As Stan became used to the car he became quicker and quicker, it was a considerable step up for him in terms of the performance of his preceding cars, he was the favourite to win the AGP at Bathurst in 1952, but excessive tyre wear resulted in a victory for Whitefords’ Lago, Stan finishing second having stopped 6 times to replace rear tyres, the 6 ply touring tyres used on the 16 inch wheels, running hotter than 4 ply racing tyres.

The racing Pirellis on order had failed to arrive on time, it’s interesting to reflect on ‘supply-lines’ in those far off days between Australia and Europe.

Stan Jones Bathurst 1951

Maybach at Bathurst, October 1951, exiting Hell Corner and heading up Mountain Straight (Malcolm Preston)

The car won three Victorian Trophy’s, the big race on the Victorian calendar, all at Fishermans Bend, another airfield circuit in Melbournes’ inner West. The first was in 1952 the car beating Whiteford with specially made 4 ply tyres for Maybach.

In 1952 stan also raced a newly acquired Cooper Mk 4 Jap 1100, successful on both the circuits and the hills.

On New Years weekend 1953 the new Port Wakefield circuit opened with Jones taking another win, he had been unbeaten in all but a couple of minor handicap races since the ’52 AGP, the sensation of the weekend the blowout of a tyre on Davisons Alfa and multiple roll over.

He was a lucky boy as only a week later Davo, Jones and Tony Gaze set off to Europe to compete in the 1953 Monte Carlo Rally. The racers were competitive, finishing 64th, at one stage having been in the top 10 amongst much faster cars in a field of 440 far more experienced teams in a Repco prepared Holden FX or ’48-215′.

Graham Howard describes this as ‘one of the great feats of Australian motoring, this trio clean-sheeted from Glasgow to Monaco and then finished 64th after minimal reconnaissance, in the final elimination, with Jones working stopwatches while sitting sideways across the front bench seat so he could use his feet to brace Davison behind the wheel’.

Stan Jones Monte Carlo Rally 1953

Jones/Davison/Gaze Holden FX,somewhere in Europe…Monte Carlo Rally 1953 (unattributed)

Stan lead the 1953 AGP at Albert Park… its inaugural meeting, by lap ten he was ahead of Whiteford by thirty seconds, by lap fourteen he and Whiteford had lapped the field, indicative of both their pace and dearth of outright contenders in Australian racing at the time.

The Maybach needed fuel and a replacement water pump drive belt. Jones then had to vacate the cockpit when he was splashed by methanol. Sluiced with water he rejoined the race, only for clutch failure to end a brave run, Doug Whiteford won in his Lago Talbot.

Some compensation for Jones was fastest lap at 2 mins 03 seconds, an average of 91.46MPH, imagine that Victorians who can remember the ‘circuit’ in its pre-modern era format?


L>R front row: Davison HWM Jag, Jones Maybach, Whiteford Lago Talbot, start of the 1953 AGP at Albert Park, its first meeting. Cec Warren #6 Maser 4CLT, Frank Kleinig #7 Kleinig Hudson, W Hayes #10 Ford V8 Spl and a smoking Ted Gray #11 Alta Ford V8. (Peter D’Abbs)

Stan Jones AGP 1953 Albert Park Maybach 2

Profile of Maybach 2 during the ’53 race (unattributed)

New Zealand Grand Prix Victory 1954…


The tension on the faces of his team is palpable as Jones fires up the engine after the monumental job in rebuilding it onernight. 10.30AM Sunday January 9 1954, Shorter Bros workshop in Auckland. Team is Don Busche, Dean in tie!, Bib Stillwell and Jack Joyce (Malcolm Preston)

Stan was said to be hard on his cars, but he also had poor luck, but everything finally came together for Jones and Maybach with a win in the first NZGP at Ardmore in 1954.

He beat a class field which included Ken Wharton in the BRM P15 V16, Peter Whitehead Ferrari 125, Horace Gould and Jack Brabham in Cooper Bristols and Lex Davison and Tony Gaze, both driving HWM’s.

It was a triumph over adversity as the car threw a rod in practice punching a sizable hole in the crankcase and damaging a cylinder bore. Dean ‘phoned Australia for spares which could not be delivered in time. Undeterred, the team; Dean, Otto Stone, Jack Joyce, Bib Stillwell and Don Busch scoured town, patched the crankcase and machined both a GMC rod whose weight was carefully matched to the originals, and a new cylinder liner.

The engine was running by 10.30AM on Sunday morning. Stan catching some ‘beauty sleep’ to be raceready, the races duration 2 hours and 45 minutes, the patched Maybach and Jones doing justice to the ingenuity and resilience of their small team.

stan nz

The spoils of victory for Jones, winner of the 1954 NZGP. Close up shot showing the quality of fabrication and build of the car . ‘Maybach 1’ in its ultimate form (KE Niven & Co)

Maybach 2…

stan 4

Stan, Maybach 2 and Charlie Dean, venue unrecorded, but early 1954. Big drums by Patons Brakes a Repco Subsidiary, big ‘Lago’ SU’s, exhaust not fitted in this shot (Unattributed)

When they returned from NZ the team began work on a new monoposto, the chassis similar in layout to Maybach 1 but adapted for the narrower and lower body.

The rear axle was of ‘speedway type’ which allowed a lower propshaft and easier change of gear ratios. Monroe Wylie tubular shocks were fitted at rear. Front suspension used Chev upper control arms. The new rear axle was attached to quarter elliptic springs but with revised control arms and a Panhard rod. Les Tepper built the chassis, Brian Burnett and Bob Baker the body.

Great attention was paid to reducing weight, aluminium was used for the body, the cars’ weight reduced from 19.5 to 16Cwt.

The engine was rebuilt with a capacity increase to 4250cc by increasing the bore to 91mm. Power was 257bhp @ 5200rpm and torque 288lb ft @ 3000rpm. The compression ratio was 11:1 and the 110 octane fuel was an intoxicating brew of 60% methanol, 20% benzol and 20% av gas. The fuel tank fabricated by Burnett held 25 gallons.

The same brakes were used with the addition of air scoops to the front backing plates and a dual master cylinder supplied by Patons Brakes.

Peugeot rack and pinion steering replaced the earlier Jeep cam and roller setup.

The first race for Maybach 2 was the Victorian Trophy at Fishermans Bend in March 1954. Jones won the race lapping the entire field with Brabhams’ Cooper T23 Bristol 3 miles behind!

stan 2

Jones victorious Maybach 2 in the Victorian Trophy at Fishermans Bend, an airfield circuit in Melbournes’ inner industrial west. March 1954. (VHRR Archive)

Further preparation for the AGP was the ‘Bathurst 100’ at Easter, 18000 spectators attended the event, one of the ‘most successful meetings ever stage at the circuit’ according to ‘The Sydney Morning Herald’. Jones won a preliminary race on Saturday but broke the gearbox in a handicap event late in the day. W Clark’s HRG won the handicap ‘100’ from Brabhams Cooper Bristol and Stan. Jones won a 3 lap scratch race in the morning, the Maybach was timed at 132.6 mph over the flying quarter-mile. Not a bad reward for the mechanic who drove back to Melbourne overnight to collect a spare ‘box!

Maybach 2 was also raced at Altona twice and again at Fishermans Bend in October in the lead up to the AGP, achieving success in the first of the 2 Altona meetings in May. He lost to Brabhams’ Cooper T23 Bristol in the handicap at Altona in June and had gearbox failure at Fishermans Bend in October.

Demonstrating his versatility as a driver, Stan competed in the 1954 Redex Round Australia Trial in the Repco ‘prepped Holden FJ navigated by CAMS co-founder Don Thomson, finishing equal fifth.

He also continued to compete in the Cooper with at least 3 wins on the circuits and again success in the hills, including lowering the Rob Roy record which had stood for 3 years.

1954 AGP…

Stan Jones Maybach 3, AGP Southport 1954

Stan Jones drives Maybach 2 onto the main straight at Southport 1954 AGP, early in the race. A road course and a very rough one at that. These now well paved roads can still be driven. (Malcolm Preston)

The 1954 AGP was held on public roads at Southport on the Gold Coast not far from Surfers Paradise.

The roads were bumpy, were recently sealed, having loose gravel shoulders some humps and two defined ‘no-passing’! sections. The crcuit was 5.7 miles long with a race distance of 155 miles or 27 laps. It promised to be a tough event.

Jones lead from the start, initially from Davisons HWM Jag and Brabhams Cooper , Malcolm Preston in his fantastic book ‘From Maybach to Holden’ records ‘…Jones was reportedly maintaining a furious pace and consistently lifting all four wheels off the ground over one of the humps…On lap 14, whilst negotiating the S bends the Maybach ran onto the gravel. As Jones endeavoured to steer the car back onto the road it spun and careered backwards into the roadside trees at an estimated 100mph…passing between 2 large trees, one tree caught the side of the engine, ripping the carburettors and front suspension from the car, whilst the body containing Jones continued a little further on its side . Jones emerged uninjured from the wreckage apart from a small cut on his lip’.

Their are mixed accounts as to the cause of the accident, those sympathetic to Repco suggest that failure of a front suspension frame weld did not occur and that Stan made a driving error. Graham Howard in his book, ‘The History of The Australian Grand Prix’ concludes, drawing on contemporary sources, that a weld failure caused the accident.

Brian Burnett who built the chassis at Repco ‘explained that the two main chassis rails, of 4 inch 16g chrome molybdenum alloy steel , passed through holes in the diaphragm-type front crossmember and were completely electrically welded into position. These welds crystallised and cracked, and in the course of the Grand Prix one chassis tube eventually broke away and touched the ground. It was a problem as simple, as enormous, as unfamiliarity with new materials and techniques’ Howards book says.

Jones was tight lipped at the time, and it was a gentler age when journalism did not go hard at a large corporate such as Repco. From Stans’ perspective it made no sense to bite the hand which fed him and be forthcoming in a manner damaging to Repco.

The race continued and was won by Davisons’ HWM, the first of his four AGP wins, from Curly Brydon and Ken Richardson in MG Spl and Ford V8 Spl respectively.

Brian Burnett, Maybachs’ body builder, Preston records, told Jones at the team de-brief at the Chevron Hotel that ‘he had driven too fast and recklessly’, Jones responded by flooring him with one punch! Out of character for a bloke who was generally the life of the party and a favourite with the ‘babes’, but perhaps reflecting Jones view that the destroyed car was not his fault.

Jones was awarded the ‘Australian Driver of The Year’ in 1954 for his NZGP, Victoria Trophy, Bathurst 100 and Victorian Hillclimb Championship title wins.


Maybach 2 on the trailer for the trip back to Melbourne. Car was destroyed by the voyage backwards through the Southport trees at high speed Main frame members clear, front suspension torn from the car. Mechanical failure or driver error? (‘History of  The AGP’ G Howard)

Maybach 3…

Shortly after returning from Southport Charlie Dean hired Phil Irving, already a famous engineer for his work on Vincent motorcycles and later the designer of the Repco ‘RB620 Series’ V8 which won Jack Brabhams 1966 World Drivers/Manufacturers Championships.

Whilst Maybach 3 was being built Stan bought Jack Brabhams ‘Redex Special’ Cooper T23 Bristol when Jack left for the UK, his businesses continuing to prosper and funding some wonderful cars.

superior cars

At Fishermans Bend in February he qualified the Cooper on pole but finished third behind Davisons’ HWM and Hunts’ Maserati. He ran the car again in the Argus Trophy at Albert Park in March finishing second to Hunts’ Maser and Whitefords’ Lago.

He also raced the Cooper 1100 and a Cooper T38 Jaguar in sports car events, winning in the latter at Fishermans Bend in February and also racing it on the hills.

Jones Cooper Jag

Jones added a Cooper T38 Jag to his stable winning in it on both the circuits and in hillclimbs. (

Early in 1955 construction of the new Maybach commenced, to lower the bodywork the engine was canted at 60 degrees, offsetting the engine and driveshaft to the right, allowing a driving position left of centre.New rear axle housings and steel gearbox housings were built to Irvings’ designs.

The remaining stock of 110mm stroke cranks were cracked, so a 100 mm one was used, with a 90mm bore the engines capacity was 3800cc. The special SU carbs could not be readily replaced so 6 Stromberg side draft carbs were used, the engine developing 240bhp @ 5000rpm.

A similar suspension layout to Maybach 2 was used. Brakes were made from flat plate steel rolled into circles and then welded at the ends, the drums were machined internally and externally for attachment to the hubs. Brian Burnett again built the body which was inspired by the contemporary Merceds Benz W196 GP car.

The car was finished in April 1955 and entered for the ‘Bathurst 100′ at Easter.It was timed at 145mph but had severe handling problems causing a spectacular spin, and finishing second to Hunts’ Maserati A6GCM. The car also had a severe flat spot and was not run in the ‘100’, Stan winning the Group B Scratch race in his Cooper 1100.

It was found that the front cross member was flexing under braking affecting the steering. Irving rectified the flatspot by devising a fuel injection system using the Stromberg throttle bodies, part throttle flow regulated by a Lucas ignition distributor with fuel delivered by an aircraft fuel pump, when dynoed the engine produced 250bhp.

Dean tested the car at Templestowe Hillclimb and Jones won the A.M.R.C Trophy at Altona, Melbourne in May from Ern Seeligers’ Cooper Bristol.

Jones raced the Cooper Bristol at Mount Druitt in Sydney in August, losing a wheel in practice but winning the preliminary race only to have the cars chassis snap in the 50 mile main race, fortunately bringing it to a halt without hurting himself.

1955 Australian Grand Prix, Port Wakefield, South Australia…

AGP 1955 Port Wakefield

Start of the race with Hunts Maser A6GCM and Stan in Maybach 3 alongside, front row. Jack Brabham and Doug Whiteford on the second row in Cooper T40 Bristol ‘Bobtail’ and Lago-Talbot (Malcolm Preston)

The car was fully rebuilt prior to the October 10 race and run in a preliminary event at Fishermans Bend the week before, Jones second to Hunt but happy with the cars performance.

Jack Brabham was racing a Cooper Bristol T40 he built himself and hitherto fairly unreliable, won the race from Hunt, who had lead in his Maser A6GCM before breaking a rocker and Jones whose clutch failed. Doug Whiteford was third in his Lago.


Stan competing at Gnoo Blas, Orange in the ‘South Pacific Championship’. Maybach DNF with a broken conrod in the race won by Hunt’s Maser 250F from the Brabham and Neal Cooper Bristols. (Gnoo Blas Classic Car Club)

Maybach was next raced at Gnoo Blas, Orange, in January 1956 in the South Pacific Road Racing Championship meeting. Hunt took the lead by a small margin, Jones second having lapped the field, Brabham a distant third. On lap 23 the Maybach broke a conrod, locking the wheels the car spinning down the road. Hunt won from Brabham.

Upon examination the block and crank were badly damaged, there were little of Deans’ original cache of spares left and in any event the more modern cars from Europe, readily available at a price meant it was increasingly difficult to develop the Maybach to the required levels of competitiveness.

After all those years Dean and Stan decided the cars ‘elite’ racing days were over.

Maserati 250F…

caversham 2

Stan Jones applying some gentle correction to his Maserati 250F ‘2520’ , AGP Caversham WA 1957 (David Van Dal)

Maybach 3 was never really competitive and Reg Hunt ‘upped the local ante’ when he imported an ex-works Maserati A6GCM in late 1954. Lex Davison followed suit with his ex Ascari/Gaze Ferrari Tipo 500/625 3 litre, Stan having the resources, invested 10000 pounds to acquire a Maserati 250F, chassis #2520 and spare 3 litre 300S engine.

Stan despatched Charlie to Modena to do the deal, ‘2520’ was built in late 1955 to ’56 spec and used by Frolian Gonzalez and Pablo Gulle in the 1956 Argentinian and Buenos Aires GP’s respectively, (DNF and 8th) before being shipped to Melbourne arriving on the ‘SS Neptunia’ on April 22 1956.

In a 1981 issue of ‘MotorSport’ magazine Alan Jones describes his joy in ‘unwrapping the car’ at Port Melbourne but also his disappointment as a 9 year old that the car was a Maserati, real Italian racing cars being Ferrari’s…

In any event Stan had the ‘ducks guts’, the most competitive customer Grand Prix car of the period, a tool with which he would demonstate his mastery over the following three years.

Australian Grand Prix , Albert Park 1956…

Jones raced the car for the first time at Port Wakefield, coming second in the wet to Stillwells’ D Type in the ‘SA Trophy’. He raced the car again in September at Bathurst winning both the 3 lap curtain raiser and ‘NSW Road Racing Championship’ later in the day setting a lap record in the process.

Stan Jones & Owen Baileys cars AGP 1956

Jones’ 250F in the foreground and Owen Baileys’ ex-Whiteford/Chiron 6 plug Lago-Talbot @ rear of the Albert Park Paddock, AGP 1956. Young mechanic in the brown overalls is noted Australian engineer/fettler Ian Tate ( Rob Bailey Collection)

Melbourne hosted the Olympic Games in 1956, the AGP at Albert Park that November is still regarded as one of the greatest ever, certainly the best to that point in the races long history. Its the event which changed the face of motorsport in Australia, such was the calibre and competitiveness of the entry and scale of the event.

The meeting was a ‘double-header’ featuring the ‘Australian Tourist Trophy’ for Sports cars on the first weekend and the AGP the following one, with support races of course, the AGP still famous for those!

The overseas entry was headed by the factory Maserati team which brought 5 cars, 3 250F’s and 2 300S sports cars for Stirling Moss and Jean Behra. They based themselves at the Esplanade Hotel nearby in St Kilda, (still there, the ‘Espy’a great pub and band venue) the cars themselves housed in Maserati driver and local Holden dealer Reg Hunts’ premises in Elsternwick, also close to the circuit.

Moss Maser AGP 1956

Moss heads out to practice the spare 250F…3 chassis came to Oz, 2 of the latest spec cars with offset driveline, lower seating position and revised bodywork, and this earlier car. Hunt tested it in practice and Brabham was entered to race it but ran his Cooper T39 Climax instead.(unattributed)

So close that the 300S were driven to and from the track, adding to the cosmopolitan atmosphere. The large local Italian community, many of whom migrated post-war turned out in force to support the red cars.

Other Maserati 250F’s were entered by Ken Wharton, Stan and Reg Hunt with Kevin Neal in Hunts’ old A6GCM. Ferraris were entered for Peter Whitehead and Reg Parnell, 555 Super Squalos’ with 860 Monza 3.5 litre 4 cylinder engines.

The strong field would test the local talent who were in cars in more or less equal performance to the vistors; Jones and Hunt in their 250F’s, Davison in his venerable 3 litre Ferrari Tipo 500. By that stage Whitefords Lago was long in the tooth, but he ran his 12 plug 26C as did Owen Bailey in Dougs’ old, successful car.

Behra and Moss AGP 1956

Jean Behra, Stirling Moss and cuppa tea! Albert Park pits AGP 1956 (unattributed)

Moss disappeared into the distance from Behra with local interest the battle of the ‘Melbourne drivers’ Jones, Hunt and Davison. Moss initially lead Behra, Whitehead, Parnell, Davison, Hunt, Neal and Jones. Baileys’ half shaft failed on the line. Jones was fast early, passing Hunt with Wharton, Parnell and Davison dropping back.

Rain started to fall with the Jones/ Hunt dice continuing until Jones eased with smoke coming from under the Masers long bonnet, post race this was found to be a broken crankcase breather pipe leaking onto the exhaust. Rain started to fall heavily with 10 laps to go Neal crashing the A6GCM into a tree breaking both of his legs and the those of the official he collected in the process. Moss won by nearly a lap from Behra, Whitehead, Hunt, Jones, Parnell and Davison.

The duel between Hunt and Jones was the first and last in similar cars, Hunt shortly thereafter retiring from racing, neither Stillwell or Glass as competitive in the car subsequently.

Jones continued to also compete in Rallies finishing second in the ‘Experts Trial’ and getting hopelessly bogged in the wastes of North Queensland in the ‘Mobilgas Trial’ co-driven by Lou Molina, legendary Melbourne racer, restauranteur and raconteur.

Jones and Hunt AGP 1956

Jones and Hunt during their spirited early AGP race 250F dice. Such a shame Hunt retired shortly thereafter, the battles between Jones, Hunt, Davison and Ted Gray in the Tornado Chev would have been megga. The other ‘maybe’ would have been Doug Whiteford in an ex-factory 250F rather than the ex-factory 300S he bought from the Maserati Team immediately after the meeting…Bob Jane bought the other 300S and sadly all 3 250F’s left the country. (unattributed)

1957 Australian Gold Star Series…

Stan shipped the Maser to NZ for the Grand Prix at Ardmore in January hoping to repeat his earlier success, the race included internationals Reg Parnell, Peter Whitehead and Jack Brabham, Stan qualified well and in a tough 240 mile race of 3 hours 7 minutes !, finished third in a typically gritty drive from Parnell and Whitehead both in Ferrari Super Squalo 555’s fitted with 3.5 litre ‘Monza’ engines. Stans 250F, 2.5 litres.

Bib Stillwell raced the ex-Hunt 250F, Reg having retired and depriving the sport of more Hunt/Davison/Jones battles.

The Maserati also gave Stan a lot of unreliability grief, his fortunes in it changing when Otto Stone took over its preaparation after the 1957 AGP held in searing 104 degree heat at Caversham in WA.

Jones was initially awarded victory after a stunning drive, on a lap count back, 2 days later, Davison got the win albeit with Bill Patterson as his co-driver, tough-nut Stan driving the distance on his own…Alec Mildren also thought he (Mildren) had won the race.


Stan Jones in practice , AGP Caversham WA 1957. Superb David Van Dal shot…makes the car look very long and low. Maserati 250F. Davisons year 1957, winning the AGP, Gold Star and Victorian Trophy in his Ferrari Tipo 500 (David Van Dal)

Lex Davison won five rounds of the championship that year winning the Gold Star from Tom Hawkes Cooper T23 Holden and Stan. Jones only Gold Star win for the year was in Queensland winning the ‘Lowood Trophy’ in August. At Bathurst a UJ broke, at Lowood a spur gear, at Bathurst the clutch failed.

Stan entered the Maser in the Victorian Trophy meetings, over two consecutive weekends in March, winning a preliminary event from the Davison Ferrari 500/625 and Brabhams’ F2 Cooper T41 Climax, but his engine let go in a big way in the 100 mile ‘Trophy’ race whilst chasing and catching Davison in the lead. A conrod broke carving the block in half after setting fastest race lap on this ‘big balls’ circuit.

Davison won from Brabham and Hawkes.

Stans businesses continued to expand, he was awarded a Holden franchise, ‘Stan Jones Motors’ was located at 408 Victoria Street, Richmond/Abbotsford. Many of his fellow ‘elite racers’ were also motor-traders including Bib Stillwell, Lex Davison, Bill Patterson, Alec Mildren, Arnold Glass, Stan Coffey and Reg Hunt.

Stan Jones 'Victorian Trophy' Albert Park 1957

Wet practice session for the Maser, ‘Victorian Trophy’ at Albert Park in March 1957. (Rodway Wolfe Collection)

AGP pit entry

Australian Gold Star Champion 1958…

Stan won at the Victorian Tourist Trophy Meeting at Fishermas Bend in February 1958 from Arnold Glass in a Ferrari Super Squalo and Doug Whiteford in an ex-works Maserati 300S sports car acquired from the Maserati team after the ’56 AGP.

In a consistent year with the now well prepared and reliable Maser Stan also won the final round of the championship, the Phillip Island Trophy race, and scored second places at Gnoo-Blas, (Orange NSW), Longford and Lowood, Queensland and won the title from Alec Mildren and Len Lukey in Coopers T43 Climax and T23 Bristol respectively.

Jones and Gray AGP 1958

Jones leads Ted Gray across the top of Mount Panorama, AGP 1958. Maser 250F from Tornado Chev. (Alan Stewart Collection)

Davo took the AGP at Bathurst in October 1958 in a thriller of a race, Jones lead for the first 17 laps with Davo in close company until the Masers’ clutch failed, and several laps later the engine. Ern Seeliger finished second in Maybach 4 (see below for specifications) with Tom Hawkes third in his Cooper T23 Bristol

AGP Bathurst 1958

Start of the ’58 GPs’ preliminary race: Ted Grays’ Tornado from Davison # 12 Ferrari Tipo 500/625 and Stan. (Bernie Rubens)

In a year of relative consistency Stan amassed enough points to win CAMS coveted ‘Gold Star’ for Australias’ Champion driver.

It was a fitting reward for one who had contributed so much to the sport and been a drawcard from the moment he stepped into Maybach 1.

agp 1958

Grid of the 1958 AGP Mount Panorama, Bathurst. Front row L>R Davison #12 Ferrari Tipo 500/625, Tom Clark Ferrari 555 Super Squalo, Ted Gray blue Tornado, row 2 L>R, Alec Mildren Cooper T43 Climax, Merv Neil Cooper T45 Climax and Curley Brydon Ferrari Chev, Tornado red clad crew well to the fore. (David Van Dal)

Jones AGP 1958

Jones, Hell Corner Bathurst AGP 1958, this shot taken from the inside of the corner the following one from the outside. These shots show the truly challenging nature of the place in the 50’s in 250bhp plus GP cars…(Ed Holly Collection)

Jones Maserati Bathurst 1958

Jones wheels his 250F into Hell Corner Bathurst 1958 AGP (Bernie Rubens)

The Australian Grand Prix win he had strived for for so long… was finally his with a win on the power circuit of Longford in Tasmania 1959.

Stans 250F was at its peak, lovingly and skilfully prepared by Otto Stone, Stan beat Len Lukeys’ Cooper T43 Climax at just the right moment…

The day of the front engined GP car was over in Australia, a bit later than in Europe. Stan was fortunate their were no 2.5 litre Coventry Climax engined Coopers in Australia at that stage, Lukeys’ little 2 litre did not quite have the ‘mumbo’ to do the job on Longfords long straights, but if anyone deserved some luck Stan certainly did!

Stan Jones AGP Longford 1959

Stan being pushed to the start in front of Arnold Glass in the ex Hunt/Stillwell 250F. Otto Stone beside Stan, fair haired Sawyer pushing Masers’ pert rear…(Walkem Family/Ellis French)

Jones lead from the start followed by Lukey and Whiteford, Whitefords Maser 300S did not survive the landing off the railway line spraying copious amounts of oil over Lukey.

Start, Longford AGP 1959

Ellis French shot as the flag has dropped catches all the ‘fun of the fair’ of country Tasmania in much simpler times…Jones from Lukey, Glass and Whiteford in the 300S. Blue colored sports car at rear is Ron Phillips’ Cooper T38 Jag…F Libre event (Ellis French)

The lap record was taken by Jones, Lukey and Glass. Lukey lead for 6 laps, Jones regained the lead , tapping Lukeys’ Cooper past the Prince of Wales Hotel. Glass made a bid for the lead, getting right up to Jones, but had to use the escape road at Mountford Corner, his brakes locking. He recovered, joining the circuit still in third in front of Mildrens’ Cooper.

Jones worked his away back to the front again, and built a small lead over Lukey, winning by 2.2 seconds from Lukey, Glass 2.5 minutes behind them and Mildren 39 seconds behind Glass.

Ted Grays’ Tornado, the other outright contender had troubles in the qualifying heats and ran a bearing in the fabulous Lou Abrahams built Australian Specials, Chev V8 on lap 4.

Jones jumping at Longford 1959

Amazing shot of Jones and Lukey ‘yumping’ their cars over the railway line towards Tannery Corner on the outskirts of Longford township (Charles Rice)

stan and len

Stan Jones and Len Lukey in their epic 1959 AGP Longford dice, the cars touched here on lap 9 (oldracephotos-ed steet)

Stan contested the Gold Star Series again in 1959 winning at Port Wakefield in Maybach 4, the car, still owned by Jones, was modified by Stans friend Ern Seeliger by fitment of a Chev Corvette 4.3 litre V8, de Dion rear suspension, a 30 gallon fuel tank and less weight.

The dry sumped Chev was fitted with 2 four barrel Carter carbs and developed 274bhp at 6000rpm and 300ft.lbs of torque.

The last victory for the car was that race at Port Wakefield, in March, in back to back wins with his AGP triumph.

port w

Stan in Maybach 4 Chev alongside Alec Mildrens’ Cooper T43 Climax. Stan won the Gold Star round at Port Wakefield in March 1959, mixing drives in the Maser and Maybach that year . Relative size of the ‘old and new’ apparent, Mildrens Cooper tiny in comparison! (Kaydee)

The 1959 Gold Star Series was very long at 12 rounds Len Lukey winning it in Coopers T23 and T43 Climax from Alec Mildren in Coopers T43 and T45 Climax and Stan.

stan and al 1959

Alan and Stan Jones, Phillip Island circa 1959. Car is Maybach 4 Chev, still owned by Stan but modified by fitment of the Corvette V8, fettled and mainly raced by Jones’ mate Ern Seeliger. PI track surface not quite what it is today…(


The Maser was advertised for sale at 4500 pounds (selling some years later for circa 2000 pounds) , Maybach 4 pressed into service at the AGP held in 1960 at Lowood, Queensland in June. The Chev engine failed after four laps, Alec Mildren taking a fanastic win by less than a second after a race long dice with Lex Davisons’ Aston DBR4/300.

Mildrens’ car was a clever combination of Cooper T51 chassis and Maserati 250S engine taken out to 2.9 litres, deservedly, he finally won the Gold Star that year, and then retired, forming a race team and over the following decade putting far more back into the sport than he ever took.

The mid engined way forward was clear, Stans new Cooper T51 2.2 Climax arrived in time for the NZ Grand Prix at Ardmore in early January 1960. Stans’ practice times were fifth quickest of a grid which included Stirling Moss, David Piper, Denny Hulme and Len Lukey all driving Coopers.

Jones finished fourth behind Brabham and McLaren in works Cooper T51 and T45 Climax 2.5’s, and Stillwell, like Stan in a new Cooper T51 but 2.2 Climax engined

Stan contested the ‘Craven A International’ at Bathurst in October 1960. He retired the car in a lap one accident, the race won by Jack Brabham, also Cooper T51 mounted.

Bathurst International 1960

Merv Bunyan photo

Bathurst Gold Star 1960

50000 people turned up to see Jack Brabham win the ‘Craven A International’ at Bathurst in 1960. Front row L>R Jones, Mildren, Brabham. The red car on row 2 is Stillwell, the yellow behind Austin Miller, the white behind him Patterson..all in Cooper T51 Climax’. The Glass 250F is clear, third row outside. (Australian Motor Racing Museum)

Grand Prix Racing changed from a 2.5 to 1.5 litre Formula in 1961 but many internationals contested our summer races…bringing 2.5 litre ex-GP cars, the ‘Tasman Series’ still 3 years away. Stirling Moss, Innes Ireland, Dan Gurney, Graham Hill, Ron Flockhart as well as our Jack raced in Australia that summer.

Stan missed the opening Gold Star round at Warwick Farm but was the fastest of the locals, making a particularly big impact on Dan Gurney at the ‘Victorian Trophy’ meeting held at Ballarat Airfield in mid February.

He was fourth, bested only by Gurney and Hill in their BRM P48’s and Ron Flockharts’ Cooper T51 Climax 2.5. Jones lead home the locals Stillwell, Mildren, Glass and Miller all in Cooper T51’s.

The commentary of the ’61 season asserts that Jones was the quickest of the Australians at the start of ’61 but only won later in the year at Lakeside in July.


Stan in his Cooper T51 Climax alongside Bib Stillwell in Aston DBR4/300. Stans’ BRDC badge proudly displayed on the Coopers side. Longford practice, March 1961 (Ron Lambert Collection)

At the ‘Longford Trophy’ in March he had a DNF on lap 4, the race won by Roy Salvadoris’ Cooper T51 Climax. At the ‘Queensland Centenary Road Racing Championships’ at Lowood in June he finished 3rd behind Bill Patterson and Mildren, both Cooper T51 mounted.

In April he contested the ‘Craven A Gold Star’ event at Bathurst finishing 2nd to Pattersons winning Cooper T51, Pattos’ Cooper and the 4 behind Jones 2.3 Climax all 2.5 litres in capacity or bigger.

But for Stan difficult times had begun…In 1961 their was credit squeeze in Australia as the Menzies Governement tightened monetary policy to control inflation with the usual brutally fast consequences of an instant drop in consumer demand. Cars included.

Sales on Jones’ multiple sites dropped and continued to decrease as consumers kept their wallets in their pockets or could not obtain consumer credit, nowhere near as sophisticated or as common as it is today. Superior Motors was sold in 1960.

If you were highly geared, as Stans businesses were, you were in trouble, his assets were progressively sold as his cashflow could not keep up with creditors demands.

Stan initially raced on and won the ‘Lakeside Libre Race’ in the Cooper in July, ahead of Arnold Glass’ Cooper T51 Maser and the Lotus 18 Ford FJ of Bruce Coventry.

He didn’t start the 1961 AGP at Mallala, South Australia, the race won by Lex Davison in a Cooper borrowed from Bib Stillwell, David Mckay was penalised for a jumped start and lost a race many believe he should have won, Davos’ AGP luck legendary!

The Gold Star was won by Patterson from Davison, Jones equal third with Bib Stillwell despite not competing at most rounds and having his mind on much bigger issues, his financial survival.

That unfortunately was the end of Jones’ racing career, he simply no longer had the financial means to compete, the fastest Australian at the start of 1961 was effectively retired twelve months later.

Stan Jones, Calder 1962

Stan Jones, John Sawyer and Otto Stone with the Cooper, Calder 1962. A drive of the car at this stage was no doubt some relief from the financial issues Jones was dealing with. (autopics)

Jones retained the Cooper, racing it at local Calder, Victoria, events several times into 1962. Whilst for sale, the 250F had not sold, Stan ran the car in an historic demonstration event at Sandown in November 1963, which seems to have been his last competition outing. By 1965 the car was sold and running in historic events in the UK.

Stan was ‘ a player’, his marriage to Alma ended in divorce, Stan gaining custody of Alan and moving to The Boulevard in Ivanhoe, a more salubrious address than Yongala Street, Balwyn. By the mid-sixties all of Stans businesses had been sold and he was struggling to find an income, all of this tumultuous for Alan, by then in his late teens.

Stan Maybach early 60's

Stan and Jack McDonald in Maybach 1, mid 60’s in the Calder or Sandown paddocks. Fit and well at this point pre-strokes. (Graham Thompson Collection)

Jones suffered two debilitating strokes in the mid-sixties. Alan, after an initial trip in 1967 moved to the UK to pursue a racing career in 1969, Stan moved there to live with Alan and Beverley, AJ’s first wife.

He died in a London hospital in March 1973 just short of his 50th birthday. He was a shadow of his former self but a family friend who visited the Jones’ in London spoke on the ‘blogosphere’ of Stan using two walking sticks but still looking dapper and smart.

Sad as this was, he would have been proud of Alan as 1973 was his breakthrough year in the UK. He had been competing in F3 for several years, winning a lot of races in a GRD 373 in 1973 and finally broke free of F3, getting his first F1 drive in the Harry Stiller owned Hesketh in 1975…

Champion Racers both, Stan and Alan…and in elite company with Antonio and Alberto Ascari.

cooper bathurst

Stan Jones Cooper T51 Climax Bathurst Gold Star , March 1961 (John Ellacott)

Where Does Stan Jones rate in the Pantheon of Local Australian drivers of The Period?…

It is much harder to rate the drivers of the period as they raced mainly cars of different performance. It isn’t like today when drivers come through controlled junior formulae and into controlled senior formulae including F1! Telemetry and the like making the job of picking who is fastest easier.

The competitor set includes Doug Whiteford, Lex Davison, Jack Brabham, (whom i have excluded from this analysis given he went overseas) Reg Hunt, Ted Gray, Alec Mildren and Len Lukey. Guys like Bib Stillwell peaked later and David Mckay wasn’t in single seaters until the very end of Stans’ career so lets say that is the ‘elite group’, based either on results or speed. (Ted Gray an example of the latter)

Whilst their is some chatter about the merits of Jones on the ‘blogosphere’ of more relevance are contemporary reports of those there in the day and assessing the drivers of the day in the context of the day.

‘Australian Motorsport Yearbook 1958/9’  refers to Jones ‘two most important overseas appearances have done more to put Australia on the map than many other drivers’. His ‘finest achievement must still be driving an Australian Special against International drivers in works cars in the first NZ International GP.’ ‘On the results of these experiences (the other being the Monte Carlo Rally) Jones should then have spent one season overseas; his potential as a racing driver, was superior, at the time to Jack Brabham’.

This did not happen primarily due to his family and business commitments so ‘ is therfore not surprising that when he has recently driven against overseas drivers, he has been unable to match their skill…’

‘It has been suggested Stan is a car killer. This is not true. Jones is the first to admit that when he began motor racing he had little knowledge of what went on under the bonnet, but on the credit side he has the ability to give the mechanics details of incorrect symptoms…’

‘It must be admitted Jones is a hard driver…This determination to win has been one of the most important factors contributing to Jones’ success…his record shows he has rarely been unplaced when completing a race.’

‘Jones has been a complete all rounder…He is not temperamental and like many similar drivers his easy friendliness off the track is only matched by his determination once a race has started.’

Stans adaptability is mentioned above, that was not unique at the time as circuit events were not as common as now so drivers with the means had to be prepared to travel interstate and to do trials, rallies and hillclimbs to get their ‘racing fix’.

Jones had the financial means to race, but so too did the ‘competitor set’ above, all sucessful businessmen/racers with the wherewithal to match their skill.

As the analysis earlier states, Stan was the quickest local driver in 1961…Dan Gurney stating after racing against him at Ballarat Airfield, ‘wow he is some driver that Stan Jones’. He successfully made the change from front to mid-engined cars, he was as adept in his Cooper Climax as Maybach 4, both entirely different beasts raced successfully in the same year.

Ray Bell, noted Australian motor racing journalist and ‘Racing Car News’ contributor talks about Jones on ‘The Nostalgia Forum’ as ‘..the dominant figure of his day. He probably won the 1957 AGP at Caversham denied by poor lapcharting by the organisers. He stood out amongst drivers of the fifties, Brabham shot off to the UK to really make an impact’. ‘At Albert Park in 1956 only two drivers took Golf Links Bend flat, Moss and Jones’

Was he our fastest of the period? Probably.

Its a pity Whiteford bought a 300S rather than a 250F from the visiting Maser factory team post the ’56 Albert Park GP, equally its a shame Hunt retired…those battles would have been interesting and perhaps conclusive.

Was he the best in the period? Possibly.

Perhaps mechanical sympathy, important at the time a slight negative.

With Davison the other ‘best’ contender and an honorable mention to Hunt who really wasn’t around long enough in outright cars to call it, he definitely had a car advantage when the A6GCM arrived, raising the bar and forcing others to buy ‘Red Cars’.

The final word to John Medley another racer/enthusiast of the period also on ‘TNForum’. He said of Stan, ‘He was an impressive operator, a determined and at times exuberant driver and usually with good equipment. Alan Jones was not the only goer in the Jones family. Stan was a serious goer full of fire and brimstone.’

Jones Maybach 4

Jones returns to the pits, final victory in Maybach 4 Chev, Port Wakefield, SA Gold Star round March 1959. (Kevin Drage)




Charlie Dean…

Charlie Dean c 1972

Repco PR shot of Charlie Dean circa 1972 (Malcolm Preston)

The importance of the Research & Development ‘Skunkworks’ Dean created at Repco post-war is important to recognise.

Its existence and focus on development by racing attracted an incredible number of talented engineers who graduated from the ‘Repco University’ and achieved much within Repco or more often outside it.

Repco engineering alumnus include Ivan Tighe, Paul England, Peter Holinger, Nigel Tait, Michael Gasking, George Wade, Don Halpin, Frank Duggan, John Brookfield, John Judd, John Mepstead, David Nash, Ian Stockings, Ken Syme, Brian and Norm Wilson and many others. Phil Irving is not on this list as he was already of world renown when he joined Repco.

This unit within the company lead to the Coventry Climax FPF maintenance program in the early ’60’s, this and the capabilities of the engineers made possible taking on the Jack Brabham request to design and build the 1966/7 World Championship winning ‘RB620 and 740’ Series of engines, a program supported and sponsored by Dean, by that time a Repco Board member.

Board membership was a considerable achievement in Deans career as Repco were for many years an Australian Stock Exchange Top 200 company. Even though by then he wore a suit, by thought, word and deed he was a ‘racer’ to his core and a fine engineer to boot.

As a Repco Director he retired compulsorily at 60 in 1973, then doing a variety of engineering projects, and some property refurbishment work. He died suddenly in 1984 after suffering a fatal blood clot following surgery after a fall moving a concrete slab at his home.

To my knowledge his story has not been fully told but it is well covered in Malcolm Prestons’ great book referred to in the bibliography.

c dean maybach 194 geo thomas

Charlie Dean, Maybach 1, Rob Roy 1948. (George Thomas)


Gaze, Davison and Jones Monaco

Tony Gaze, Lex Davison and Stan Jones with their Holden, Monaco quayside, Monte Carlo Rally 1953 (unattributed)

1958 AGP Bathurst

1958 AGP, Mount Panorama, Bathurst…Stan in his 250F from Ted Grays Tornado Chev and Davison in the Ferrari 500/625, first lap. Hell Corner from the inside, beginning the run up the mountain…(Peter Wherrett Collection)


Barry Green ‘Glory Days’, Malcolm Preston ‘Maybach to Holden’, Graham Howard ‘History of The Australian Grand Prix’, ‘Australian Motorsport Yearbook 1958/9’, ‘The Nostalgia Forum’

Photo Credits…

David Van Dal, John Ellacott, Ron Lambert,, Rodway Wolfe Collection, Merv Bunyan Collection, Bernie Rubens, John Ellacott, Charles Rice, Ellis French, B Dunstan, Ed Steet, Walkem Family, KE Niven & Co, Peter Wherrett Collection, Australian Motor Racing Museum, Rob Bailey Collection, Kevin Drage, Dacre Stubbs Collection,, Graham Thompson Collection, Ray Eldershaw Collection, Alan Stewart Collection, Ed Holly Collection,, George Thomas, VHRR Archive