Hawthorn, Aintree 1957…

Posted: April 20, 2017 in F1, Fotos
Tags: , ,
hawthorn

(Klemantaski)

 A study in concentration, Mike Hawthorn at work and on the way to fourth place at Aintree, Lancia Ferrari 801, British Grand Prix 1957…

But Mike was hardly ‘the main game’ in this race, a pivotal one in GP history.

Tony Brooks and Stirling Moss shared a Vanwall to win at home, thereby scoring the first world championship victory for a British car, the beginning of a period of dominance by British teams, largely undiminished for the last 50 years. Also noteworthy and equally epochal was the appearance of two Cooper T43 Climaxes driven by Roy Salvadori and Jack Brabham.

Behra led from the start but Moss passed him before the end of the first lap, then came Brooks, Hawthorn, Collins, four Brits in the first five.

Moss’s Vanwall started to run roughly so he pitted, taking the wheel of Brooks sister car, who was summoned to the pits, Moss rejoined 9th and started carving his way through the field. By this stage Jean led from Hawthorn, who was unable to challenge the Frenchie, then came Lewis-Evans, Vanwall, and Collins. Moss was soon up to 5th aided by mechanical failures which befell Fangio and Collins.

Poor, Jean, his clutch exploded whilst in the lead, Hawthorn ran over some of the schrapnel the Frenchman dropped, puncturing a Continental. Stuart Lewis-Evans then momentarily lead but was quickly swallowed by Moss, Stuart’s throttle linkage broke but it mattered not, Moss won the race from Musso, Hawthorn, Trintignant/Collins all in Lancia Ferrari’s with Roy Salvadori in the little 2 litre Cooper T43 5th

image

Credit…

Louis Klementaski, GP Encyclopaedia

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Comments
  1. David Rees says:

    That black & white shot is just magnificent. That man certainly had the eye, didn’t he? I once asked Jesse Alexander a long time ago what he thought of Klementaski’s images and all he said was: “just lovely”.

    • markbisset says:

      Yes indeed David, they are all magnificent, and monochrome has qualities of depth and softness about it that colour does not.
      I was in a design business for many years, the most talented of my partners described the creative process as a blend of ‘concept, percept and execution’ -,Klemantaski had it in spades, so too Alexander of course.
      Mark

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