Posts Tagged ‘1960 Solitude Grand Prix’

John Surtees looking very cheery prior to the 1960 Solitude GP aboard his Rob Walker/works/AFN Porsche 718/2, 24 July 1960…

And so he should, not long before he had won the 500cc motorcycle GP aboard an MV Agusta before jumping into his car for the Formula 2 Grand Prix, his fortunes in that event not so good.

I found this photo randomly on Getty Images, this brief Porsche chapter of the great mans career was not one I was familiar with but a couple of my online buddies identified the event- many thanks to Roger Virtigo and Glenn Ducey.

My initial plan for this article was a quickie on Surtees’ first year in cars but then I became rather enamoured of the Solitude circuit, in particular the significance of the 1960 race for reasons which will become clear when you read the great Denis Jenkinson’s MotorSport account of the weekend.

Whilst still the benchmark in grand prix motorcycle racing – he would retain both his 350cc and 500cc world titles aboard MV’s in 1960 – Surtees at 26 years of age, stepped into cars that year.

Surtees ventures onto Goodwood, Cooper T52 BMC FJ 19 March 1960 (LAT)

Clark from Surtees, Lotus 18 Ford and Cooper T52 BMC, Goodwood, 19 March 1960 (LAT)

His first race on four wheels was in Formula Junior at Goodwood on 19 March. He finished second to rising star Jim Clark’s Lotus 18 Ford during the BARC Members Meeting in a Ken Tyrrell Cooper T52 BMC. Click here for a short article about his debut; https://primotipo.com/2016/01/18/surtees-first-car-races/

Two months later he made his F1 world championship start at the Monaco GP in late May- Q15 and DNF gearbox on lap 17 in the race won by Stirling Moss in Rob Walker’s Lotus 18 Climax FPF.

In Surtees home GP in July, the British at Silverstone, he finished second, an amazing performance, Jack Brabham won on the way to his second World Championship aboard his works Cooper ‘Lowline’ T53 Climax.

Whilst the Lotus 18, Colin Chapman’s first mid-engined design was in many ways the 1960 ‘Car of The Year’ it was still amazing stuff, the transition from two to four wheels never done as smoothly before or since.

Surtees, works Lotus 18 Climax, on the way to 2nd in the 1960 British @ Silverstone-ain’t she chunky but pretty sans roll bar. And fast (unattributed)

It was with his tail up that Surtees headed off to the Solitude Grand Prix, that year an F2 race for cars of 1.5 litres or less in capacity.

The 7.1 mile Solitude circuit, a few miles out of Stuttgart had been in existence for many years- used mainly for motorcycle racing it took its name from Schloss Solitude, an old German castle on top of one of the hills overlooking the valley in which the circuit lay. The circuits narrow width precluded its use for cars until that was addressed, an international Formula Junior race was run in 1959 with the 1960 F2 race appropriate for a circuit Denis Jenkinson, who had raced on it as a motorcycle competitor, rated as one of the best in Europe.

The entry was excellent with the works Porsche, Ferrari and Lotus teams competing, as well as Jack Brabham with a Cooper

Porsche fielded five cars altogether, determined to win on their own proving ground with Bonnier, Hill and Herrmann driving the regular three factory cars. The Rob Walker car had been retrieved, a standard Porsche racing gear-change put back on it and loaned to Surtees, while a brand new car was finished the night before practice and driven by Dan Gurney, so the whole BRM team were being used!

Team Lotus entered three works Lotus 18’s driven by Ireland, Clark and Trevor Taylor, the last two also driving in the Formula Junior race with other 18’s.

Scuderia Ferrari sent two entries, one a normal front-engined 246 with a Dino 156 engine driven by Phil Hill, and the other a new version of the F2/60 rear-engined experimental car, driven by von Trips. ‘This car was basically the rear-engined model (246P) that appeared at Monaco and Zandvoort, but had undergone a lot of modifications. The construction of the wishbones had been altered and also their size and positioning on the chassis, so that although there were still double-wishbones and a coil-spring to each wheel they were of a new pattern. The 1 1/2-litre V6 Dino 156 engine was coupled to the gearbox/final drive unit used on the car at Zandvoort, still with inboard disc brakes, but instead of the clutch-operating mechanism being mounted on the last chassis cross-member it was now on an alloy casting bolted to the rear of the gearbox casing and curving round the left side of the clutch body, which was still exposed. Consequently the chassis tube extensions beyond the gearbox were cut off and the space frame finished under the gearbox. There was no water header tank over the engine and the vertical distributor had been replaced by a horizontal one on the front of the engine, so the high head faring could be done away with and the rear decking was made flat, like a Lotus, with a perspex bubble open at the front over the three downdraught Weber carburetters. The tail of the car ended in an aperture fitted with a grille that would have made a nice radiator cowling for a front-engined car, and two long thin megaphone exhaust pipes stuck out the back, protruding well beyond the extremity of the body. The short, stumpy nose of the car was much as before, with the radiator fed from a typical 1960 Ferrari cowling and the cockpit having a wrap-round screen’.

The significance of the above car, the mid-engined 1.5 litre V6 Ferrari 246P will be clear to most of you, the car referred to above was the prototype of the machines which would dominate grand prix racing in 1961, the commencement of the new 1.5 litre F1. I wrote about this car a while back;

https://primotipo.com/2015/10/04/monaco-panorama-1958/

GP gridding up. #22 Gurney Porsche 718/2, #4 Bonnier and #5 Herrmann ditto 718/2, #7 is the mid-engine Ferrari 246P 1.5 of Von Trips and the subject of extensive coverage by Jenkinson above. #6 Hill G Porsche 718/2, #14 Wolfgang Seidel Cooper T45 Climax, #16 Innes Ireland Lotus 18 Climax, #11 Jack Lewis Cooper T45 Climax (unattributed)

Jack Brabham represented Cooper with a 1959 car built up from bits and pieces, either a T43 or T45 and was looked after by his own mechanic- they were still cobbling the car together as practice got underway, whilst the rest of the Coopers were private entries.

‘With rain pouring down during the first session of practice there was little hope of judging how things would go, except that von Trips was outstandingly fast in the rear-engined Ferrari, at one time being 30 sec faster than anyone else and passing the factory Porsches on the winding leg of the circuit and leaving them. Although the car was sliding and slithering about in the wet von Trips seemed quite unconcerned, feeling perfectly safe in the car.’

‘The second session was a lot better…The rear-engined Ferrari was still going well and was soon down below the old sports-car record of 4 min 34.4 sec, and went on to get below 4 min 30 sec. The only driver to challenge von Trips was Jimmy Clark, who was benefiting from double practice, being out with the Formula Junior cars as well as the Formula 2 cars, and as the afternoon wore on he went faster and faster. The only other driver to get below 4 min 30 sec was Hans Herrmann and he was down to 4 min 28.3 sec, but von Trips had done 4 min 24.1 sec, while just as practice finished and the track was at its driest for the day, Clark did 4 min 23.6 sec…Practice took place again for 11/2 hours on Saturday afternoon, but once again rain completely washed things out and everyone’s times were nearer 5 min than 41/2 min.’

The challenges of the road circuit resulted in Australian rider Bob Brown’s death later from head injuries sustained when he fell from his Honda 250-4 during the motorcycle practice session.

The 30 year old, born at Little Plains near Inverell, New South Wales trained as motor mechanic and worked as such and as a taxi-driver in Sydney before local success led to seeking fame in Europe in 1955.

After doing well on privately owned bikes he was picked up by Gilera in 1957. In 1959, riding his private Nortons he was third in both the 350 and 500 World Championships beaten only by the works MV’s. Because of his experience aboard the Gilera fours in 1957 he was offered a works Honda 250-4 in 1960 on a race by race basis. On one of these technically very advanced machines, commented upon by Jenkinson below, he was 4th at the IOM TT becoming the first Western rider to score points on a Japanese bike.

Bob Brown, place and date unknown (AMCN)

Solitude was only a month later, Brown crashed on dirt or grit brought onto the surface by errant cars on the ‘notorious sand pit curve’ on the twisty Mahdenthal section of the course. Another theory has it that he was cruising back to the pits with a misfiring engine which suddenly popped onto all four cylinders- whatever the case he was tossed off his mount sustaining head injuries to which he later succumbed.

Even though he only contested four of the seven 500cc championship rounds in 1960, Brown was still 4th in the championship standings aboard his trusty Norton behind three MV’s- at Assen he was 2nd where he split the MV entries. In an lovely tribute to this little known Australian, Honda in its book ‘The Race for Leadership: 1961 World Championship Road Race’ the company produced to celebrate its maiden World 125/250 titles won by Tom Phillis and Mike Hailwood-Honda wrote that ‘Brown untiringly helped the Japanese riders who were new to the game and actively helped to improve the Honda-Four. Bob Brown was one of the foundations of Honda success’.

GP, the off. Bonnier from Hill and Hermann all Porsche 718/2, then Von Trips Ferrari 246P and to the outside of him Ireland’s Lotus 18, #19 Surtees and #22 Gurney both Porsche 718/2 with Jim Clark’s distinctive Lotus 18 to Gurney’s outside and the rest (Getty)

‘Sunday was happily fine and sunny and a crowd of 250,000 lined the circuit to watch first of all the motorcycle races, then a vast procession of publicity vehicles, and finally, the Formula Junior and Formula 2 car races.

In the 250-cc motorcycle race the outstanding thing was the Japanese Honda machine which finished third, this having a four-cylinder twin-overhead camshaft engine with four valves per cylinder and developing its peak power at 13,500 rpm, while it would safely run up to 16-17,000 rpm.

The technical variety of engine development in the motorcycle-­racing world was something which made the Formula 2 racing world realise that we are stagnating for want of new engine designs. The 250-cc motorcycles had vertical twins, transverse fours, single cylinders, and two-strokes both air- and water-cooled, and there seemed to be no accepted layout which everyone was following.’

Surtees on the way to his 500cc MV Agusta Solitude GP win (unattributed)

‘The 500-cc class saw the usual easy win for John Surtees on the MV Agusta four-cylinder machine, and then we passed to Formula Junior.

The race was a complete sweep for Lotus-Ford cars, the works car of Jimmy Clark having an unchallenged win after Henry Taylor in Tyrell’s Cooper­-BMC had blown up his engine. Trevor Taylor was confidently following Clark in second place and they forgot the opposition so much that they overlooked Ouveroff in another Lotus-Ford, who suddenly closed on them two laps before the end and split their confidence, finishing in second place. Of the first six cars, five were Lotus-Fords, odd man out being Ballisat with Tyrell’s second Cooper-BMC.’

Grid of the FJ race. #1 Clark Lotus 18 Cosworth, black Cooper alongside Keith Ballisat Cooper T52 BMC?, #9 Juan-Manuel Bordeu Lola Mk2 Ford, #3 settling into his car Pater Arundell Lotus 18 Cosworth and the rest (unattributed)

‘Finally we came to the race of the day, with weather conditions perfect and twenty cars lined up on the grid, the only non-starter being de Beaufort, whose Climax engine was beyond repair…The race was to be run over 20 laps, a distance of 228.340 kilo­metres and the start was perfect, with Bonnier just leading the field towards the first corner. At the end of the opening lap the first nine cars were so close that it was relatively unimportant who was leading, though in fact it was Graham Hill in front of Bonnier, with Herrmann, von Trips, Gurney, Ireland, Surtees, Brabham and Clark following.

With the track nice and dry for the first time this little lot were really motor racing, the standing lap being in 4 min 24 sec, and the first flying lap in 4 min 15.1 sec (virtually 100 m.p.h. average). Bonnier led on lap two, von Trips on lap three and Clark on lap four, while the others were nose-to­-tail in varying orders, there being no signs of a procession begin­ning as yet. With the exception of Clark and Taylor, who had just driven in the Junior race, none of the others knew anything about the circuit in the dry, so we were witnessing, in effect, the first really serious practice session, and it was really serious. While Trevor Taylor was a bit out of his depth in this race, only his second with an F2 car, Clark was really profiting from his Junior race and his progress on the first few laps was 9th, 6th, 3rd and 1st, and having got the lead he drew away steadily, driving most beautifully, setting a new lap record at 4 min 08.0 sec.’

Clarks’s Lotus 18 Ford during his victorious run in the FJ race, he won from two other Lotus 18’s- Aussie Steve Ouvaroff  and Lotus teammate Trevor Taylor (unattributed)

‘Meanwhile the rest of the runners were learning the circuit in the dry, and Herrmann led von Trips, Bonnier, Gurney, Graham Hill, Brabham and Ireland, while Surtees was having gear-change trouble and dropping back a bit, to be caught by Phil Hill in the front-engined Ferrari. Then came Lewis all on his own, having outstripped the rest of the private owners, but not quite fast enough to keep up with the works drivers, and already Schlesser had fallen out with crankshaft trouble. On lap six von Trips passed Herrmann once more and Graham Hill passed Gurney, but on the next lap Gurney was in front again, and at the end of the field Bianchi retired with a broken oil pipe and Seidel gave up as he thought his shock-absorbers were not working.’

On lap eight Clark had 1/2 sec lead but Herrmann was back in second place and Phil Hill had moved up a place into ninth position ahead of Surtees, and still the first ten cars were all pressing on at unabated speed. On lap nine Clark began to get worried about rising water temperature, for there had been signs of a head gasket leak on the starting line, while Herrmann and von Trips were now getting into their stride and the Ferrari brought the lap record down to 4 min 07.5 sec, and for the first lap since the start of the race there was no change in the order anywhere through the field. Halfway round lap 10 the leading Porsche and the rear-engined Ferrari were gaining rapidly on the Lotus and as Clark finished his tenth lap he drew into the pits, just as Herrmann and von Trips went by. In a flash the next eight cars were past, while water was poured into the Lotus and Clark restarted in tenth place, for Lewis also drew into the pits to retire with two broken main-bearing caps and a ruined crankcase. Behind the leading bunch came Trintignant, Taylor, Gregory, Gendebien, Laureau, Barth and Cabral in that order but spaced out.

Having got the lead Herrmann really flew and lapped in 4 min 07.0 sec, but von Trips was not giving in and two laps later recorded 4 min 06.4 sec and closed on Herrmann, and the two of them were now leaving Bonnier behind, who was being followed by Graham Hill and Gurney, who were changing positions continuously, and behind them came Phil Hill and Ireland, also chopping and changing places, while some way back Trevor Taylor had got in front of Trintignant. On lap 11 Brab­ham gave up with a split head gasket, never having been in the picture, and Surtees was slowing visibly, his continual gear-­selection trouble having caused missed gears and subsequent bent valves.

On lap 13 von Trips was only a few lengths behind Herrmann’s Porsche, on the next lap he was right on his tail and he stayed like that for two more laps, while the two of them drew 16 sec ahead of Bonnier, but Graham Hill and Gurney were urging each other along and were catching Bonnier. On lap 16 Herrmann did 4 min 06.0 sec, but on lap 17 von Trips replied with 4 min 04.7 sec and sailed by into the lead, and the Ferrari really showed its possibilities by pulling out a 11/2-sec lead over the Porsche. Graham Hill and Gurney were still passing and re-passing and were now up with Bonnier, while Ireland and Phil Hill had not yet settled their battle.

On lap 15 Trevor Taylor had retired at the pits when a cam-­follower had broken and on lap 16 Surtees had run wide on a corner trying to take it in a high gear to save the trouble of sorting the selectors out, and had spun on some loose gravel and stalled. Clark was still running, but a long way back from the leaders, and most of the tail-enders had been lapped. The rear-engined Ferrari was now safely in front and von Trips was making no mistake and he finished the 20 laps nicely ahead of Herrmann, having thoroughly trounced the Porsche team on their own door­step. On lap 19 Graham Hill got into third place, but on the last lap Bonnier got by him down the straight and led him over the line with Gurney right behind them, and a little way back Phil Hill led Ireland on the penultimate lap only to be re-passed yet again on the last lap.

For once this had been real motor racing, with the first seven cars all going as hard as they knew how for the whole race, and if this was a foretaste of 1961 Grand Prix racing then no-one is going to be disappointed. Dan Gurney summed up this excellent race very nicely when he said : “I’ve never had to drive so hard in my life just for fifth place”. DSJ.’

Beautiful shot of Surtees Lotus 18 on the cobbled pave of the Oporto streets (LAT)

Surtees further showed his mettle at Oporto, the Portuguese Grand Prix held on 14 August.

In only his third event in 2.5 litre Grand Prix cars he put his Team Lotus 18 on pole on the unfamiliar challenging portside/coastal circuit.

Surtees lost out in the early skirmishes as Dan Gurney’s BRM P48 grabbed the lead, but he soon overcame Stirling Moss, Lotus 18 Climax – returning from injuries sustained at Spa – to run 2nd. The Lotus then closed on Gurney and was poised to challenge for the lead when the BRM hit engine trouble. Moss now moved forward and started applying pressure to Surtees, only to have to pit for a plug change on his Lotus 18. That left Surtees comfortably clear of reigning world champion Jack Brabham.

But Surtees had been battling with a fuel leak and, eventually, his petrol-soaked feet slipped off the pedals. The resulting incident burst the Lotus’s radiator and forced Surtees out of the race, but he looked at home up front of the field, which is rather where he belonged!

Another shot of Surtees on the run at Oporto (B Cahier)

Did you say the motel was to the left or right? Surtees on the road @ Riverside 1960. Lotus 18 Climax (Getty)

With his motorcycle commitments the only other F1 championship appearance for the great Brit that year was at Riverside, site of the 1960 US Grand Prix in late November.

There he qualified his Team Lotus 18 6th but spun and was collected by teammate Clark causing John’s retirement. Clark soldiered on using the nose cone off Surtees car! Stirling Moss won the race in the Walker Lotus 18, the fastest combination of the year- and noting Moss’ monster accident at Spa in June which outed him from mid-June till late November.

Surtees made a huge impact in his first season in cars- he was off to UDT Laystall for 1961 on an inexorable rise which took him via Lola to Ferrari in 1963 and a world title in 1964. Click here for an article on his Ferrari 158 championship year;

https://primotipo.com/2014/11/30/john-surtees-world-champion-50-years-ago/

Etcetera: Denis Jenkinson’s description of the wild Solitude road circuit…

‘The starting area is wide and level and a short straight leads into a series of four left-hand bends, they can be taken in one complete arc, to form a very large-radius hairpin, “Glemseck,” turning the direction of the road through 180 degrees. Between the start and the first corner are the pits, intelligently placed at an angle to the main track, the first pit being some 20 feet from the edge of the track and the last one being about 10 feet from the edge, thus allowing everyone in the pits a fairly unobstructed view and making a very large wedge-shaped pit area.

After turning through 180 degrees the road climbs steeply up the side of a hill, round a very tight hairpin to the right, “Hedersback,” and on up the hill on a gradient of nearly 1 in 61/2, levels out a bit on a left curve and then climbs up round a fast right-hand curve to the top of the hillside. Here it takes a long fast left-hand bend over the brow, “Frauenkreuz,” and down the other side, followed by another very fast downhill right-hand curve, and drops over a sharp brow to plunge down into a sharp left-hand corner, in thick woods. As the road levels out here this corner can be taken faster than imagined for the sudden cessation of losing height as you hit the corner means that the car gets a terrific downward thrust from its own weight, helping the cornering power of the tyres. From here the road is more or less level and to all intents and purposes is straight, although in actual fact there are two left-hand curves, but these are flat out. This ends in a very sharp right-hand hairpin that drops downhill to a left­hand hairpin that continues to drop downhill and is followed by a short straight rush down to a lake.

Here the road turns sharp left round the edge of the lake and from here to the start the road runs along the bottom of a valley and is flat, but by no means straight. From the lake to the starting area there is a series of fast and slow corners, running through woods with a high bank on the right. This is the most difficult part of the course, for so many of the corners look alike and all are rather similar as regards surroundings, making them difficult to identify, and for 31/2 kilo­metres after leaving the lake, on this home stretch, there is no straight and the car has to be whipped from one lock to the other. The last of this long series of swerves is a left-hander which brings you out of the woods and onto the short pits straight.

The circuit measures 11.417 kilometres to the lap (approximately seven miles) and contains just about every situation one could wish for in a racing circuit, and the whole thing is on normal public roads, closed for the occasion of racing, and sports cars lapped it at 150 kph (approximately 93 mph).’

Innes Ireland clipping the grass for the Solitude organisers during his victorious run during the 1961 GP- his works Lotus 21 Climax won from Jo Bonnier’s Porsche 718 and Dan Gurney’s similar car. Here he leads Jack Brabham Cooper T53 Climax not long after the start. The fast, open, wooded terrain of the circuit shown in this marvellous shot (Sutton)

Bibliography…

Solitude GP race report by Denis Jenkinson in MotorSport August 1960, Autosport, oldracingcars.com, Australian Motorcycling News article by Don Cox, ‘Motorcycle GP Racing in The 1960’s’ Chris Pereira, F2 Index

Photo Credits…

Getty Images, LAT, Sutton, Bernard Cahier, Australian Motorcycle news

Tailpiece: Likely Lads- Ireland, Clark, Surtees and Chapman, what an array of talent! Team Lotus, Oporto, Portugal 1960…

Finito…

 

monaco 1958

Quite a stunning 1960 Monaco Vista…

I was trawling the internet, as i do, looking for the photos which inspire the articles i create, one of the reasons why this blog is so nuttily diverse is to do with that approach.

I found this shot, unattributed as most of them are, but saying ‘Monaco 1966’ which it most definitely is not!

Its one of those ‘the more you look, the more you see shots’; the steam train, four nurses sitting together, the working port, none of your fancy-schmancy big yachts of today and of course the car itself!

Thats the tricky bit; its not sharp in focus but i think it might, might be Luigi Musso’s #34 Ferrari Dino 246 in the ’58 race.

richie

GP debutant Richie Ginther on his way to 5th place in the Ferrari Dino 246P ‘008’, Monaco 1960. (unattributed)

Since posting this shot reader Grant Perkins has done some research and confirmed the photo is actually of Richie Ginther at Monaco in 1960 in the Ferrari Dino 246P…

Stirling Moss won the race in Rob Walker’s Lotus 18 Climax, Chapman’s first championship win as a manufacturer, from Bruce McLaren’s Cooper T53 Climax and Phil Hill’s Ferrari Dino 246.

The shot is historically significant as Ginther made his GP debut that weekend and his mount, the Ferrari 246P, the Scuderia’s first mid-engined racing car, competed for the first time.

Monaco 1960 is also significant for the long awaited but far too late appearance of Lance Reventlow’s Scarabs. These superbly engineered but heavy, unwieldy front engined cars entered GP racing just as Ferrari, the last team racing a front-engined car experimented with its mid-engined replacement. A tangent too far for this article but an interesting topic for another time.

scarab

Monaco 1960. #46 Chuck Daigh and #48 Lance Reventlow Scarab’s #34 Ginther’s Ferrari 246P. (Dave Friedman Collection)

Ferrari built the 246P in secret, it was tested at Modena by Hill, Ginther and factory tester Martino Severi on 22 May, the design perceived by its drivers to have too much weight at the rear causing the nose to lift under acceleration.

Despite the fact that a Cooper won their first Grand Prix in Argentina in 1958, in Moss’ hands and Jack Brabham’s Cooper win in the 1959 World Championship was the first for a mid-engined car and further that Ferrari’s front engined Dino’s were struggling to keep up, Carlo Chiti had to fight hard to build a mid-engined prototype.

Ferrari’s conservatism was proven time and again over the years, they were not often innovators or early adopters, some examples; the change from drum to disc brakes, wire wheels to alloys, carburettors to fuel injection, ladder frame to spaceframe chassis, spaceframe chassis to monocoque and so on.

Fortunately the car, allocated chassis number ‘246-0008’, showed enough promise to race at Monaco on 29 May. By the end of the year ‘0008’ had morphed from a prototype 2.5 litre F1 car into a 1960 1.5 litre F2 ‘156’, becoming an F1 156 with the GP rule change from 2.5 to 1.5 litre engines from 1 January 1961.

‘008’ became Giancarlo Baghetti’s race chassis for 1961 and part of the amazing start to his F1 career; the Italian famously winning his first 3 GP’s; Syracuse, Naples and finally the French GP, in so doing Giancarlo became the only man to ever win his first championship GP.

So ‘0008’ won the first of many GP’s the 156 design took in 1961 on its way to dual World Titles; the Drivers and Manufacturers in 1961.

Their isn’t a happy ending for the chassis though, Giancarlo spun out of the wet British GP at Aintree a week after his Reims win doing enough damage to ‘0008’ that it was scrapped…mind you, Ferrari famously destroyed all of the 156’s at the end of the 1962 season when the cars were as uncompetitive as they had been fast the year before.

From mid-engined 2.5 litre F1 prototype at Monaco on May 6 1960 to 1.5 litre F1 winner at Syracusa on 25 April 1961, ‘0008’s story is a short but historically significant and interesting one.

ginther

Enzo Ferrari and the Ferrari 246P designer, Carlo Chiti, watch Martino Severi testing their first mid-engined car ‘246-0008’ at Modena May 1960. (unattributed)

modena

Phil Hill testing the Ferrari 246P at Modena 1960, the suburb oh-so-close to the circuit! Compare the body of ‘0008’ here with its Italian GP spec. (unattributed)

1960 Monaco Grand Prix…

Ginther qualified the new car 9th, between the front engined Dino’s of Von Trips 8th and Phil Hill 10th. In the race Hill was 3rd, Richie 6th and Von Trips 8th but not running at the finish.

ginther monaco

29 year old Richie Ginther makes his GP debut at Monaco 1960. Ferrari 246P. (Dave Friedman Collection)

monaco

Ginther’s new developmental mid-engined Ferrari Dino 246P-0008 #34 beside the conventional front-engined 3rd placed Dino 246 of Phil Hill at Monaco in 1960. Difference in size not that great at this stage. Some sources say Ferrari acquired a Cooper to understand that cars packaging and suspension geometry ‘tricks’. (unattributed)

fazz zand

Ferrari 246P in the Zandvoort pitlane 1960. (unattributed)

The team took the 246P to Zandvoort for the following Dutch GP but the engine, which had not been rebuilt’ was burning and blowing so much oil that it was unraced…

Ginther raced a conventional front engined Dino as did his teammates, they were comprehensively blown off by large numbers of Lotus and Coopers, Ginther in 12th was the quickest Ferrari qualifier; Von Trips was 5th, Ginther 6th and Phil Hill retired with engine failure on lap 13.

The race was won by Jack Brabham’s Cooper T53 Climax on the way to his second title on the trot.

zandvoort

Cars being marshalled before the start of the Dutch GP on June 6 1960. #3  Ginthers Ferrari Dino 246, #5 Alan Stacey Lotus 18 Climax DNF, #12 Bruce McLaren Cooper T53 Climax DNF, #9 Tony Brooks Cooper T51 Climax DNF, #6 Jim Clark Lotus 18 Climax DNF. (unattributed)

Ferrari Dino 246P Technical Specifications…

Whilst ‘0008’ car didn’t race at Zandvoort, photographer George Phillips took some rare shots of a Ferrari too little has been written about, the car practiced with the number ‘3T’.

front

246P front suspension by upper and lower wishbones, coil spring/koni dampers and roll bar. Disc brakes. (George Phillips)

side

Chassis ‘Tipo 543’, welded tubular steel, described as ‘Cooper’ in style if not in the quality of the welding! Borrani wire wheels 15 inches diameter, Dunlop tyres 5.25/6.5 inches wide front/rear. Wheelbase 2300mm, track 1200mm front and rear. Fuel capacity 150 litres. Weight wet 452kg. (George Phillips)

engine

Engine ‘Tipo 171’ derived from the Tipo 134. 65 degree, all alloy, DOHC, 2 valve V6. Bore/stroke 85X71mm, capacity 2417cc. 3 Weber 42 DCN carburettors, twin plugs fired by Marelli magneto, dry sumped. 265bhp@8300rpm. (George Phillips)

rear sus

Rear suspension upper and lower wishbones, coil spring/Koni dampers and roll bar. Gearbox ‘Tipo 543’ 5 speed and reverse, LSD, note also the clutch location at the back of the ‘box. You can just see the top of the inboard brake rotor beside the chassis member. (George Phillips)

Development of the 246P and its Evolution into the 156…

Ferrari decided to abandon further development of the 246P as a 2.5 litre GP car and focus their attention on the front-engined Dino’s for the balance of the season and the future 1.5 Litre GP car for the new Formula 1.

The basis of the new 1.5 litre F1 engine was the Vittorio Jano designed 1.5 litre ‘Dino V6’ already used in Ferrari’s front engined F2 car’s which first raced in 1957.

Von Trips won the 1960 F2 season opening Syracuse GP in March 1960 in one of these cars, ahead of 2 Coopers.

syracuse

Taffy von Trips winning the 10th Syracuse GP, 19 March 1960. Ferrari Dino 156. He won from the Cooper Climaxes of Trintignant and Gendebien. (George Phillips)

Chiti progressively modified the engine, initially retaining the 65 degree angle but then changed to 120 degrees, the wide Vee angle has the benefit of the very low centre of gravity and rear bodywork which was as much a styling signature of the 1961 156 as its ‘sharknose’. ‘Definitive’ spec 1961 156’s raced with the 120 degree engine, but the 65 degree was also used. ‘0008’ was always fitted with the 65 degree spec unit.

solitude

Taffy von Trips at Solitude in ‘0008’ in 1960. LF wheel off the deck. Ferrari 246P/156, victorious over the Porsches. (unattributed)

The test bed for the new engine was the 246P ‘0008’. After the car with revised bodywork and 1.5 litre V6 was fitted it was tested at Modena and then entered at the 10th Solitude F2 GP, Germany on 24 July where Taffy von Trips belted the Porsche 718/2’s, a great F2 car on their home ground, the aristocrat lead home Hans Hermann, Jo Bonnier, Graham Hill and Dan Gurney, all in factory Porsche’s.

Further testing and development of ‘0008’ followed. With many of the British teams punting on the Intercontinental Formula for 1961, Ferrari were developing a formidable weapon for the new 1.5 F1, the implementation of which was confirmed much to the Brits chagrin as they wouldn’t have  competititive engines until 1962.

At the Italian Grand Prix at Monza in September Ferrari raced ‘0008’ in what was getting close to the 156’s definitive 1961 specification,‘0008’ in 1.5 litre F2 form was raced by Taffy Von Trips to 5th place fitted with an auxiliary fuel tank amongst the 2.5 litre GP cars.

taffy front

At the Italian GP in September 1960 Ferrari ran Taffy von Trips in 246P/156 ‘0008’. Both this and the shot below show how much more ‘svelte’ the car became compared its Monaco spec in May…not as small as the best of the British cars mind you, but in ’61 the Brits were hamstrung by lack of suitable/competitive engines. (Archie Smith)

von Trips had the 1.5 ltre F2 class to himself outrunning Hermann’s Porsche 718/2 by a full lap. Phil Hill won the race, the final GP victory for a front engined car but it was a hollow one; the sneaky Italians decided to have their 1960 race on the combined Monza road course and banking to maximise the chances of the old-tech Fazz’s winning the race, power the Ferrari’s only advantage over the 4 cylinder Coventry Climax FPF and BRM engined cars. The Brits then told the organisers to ‘jam it’ on safety grounds and most boycotted the event.

taffy rear

von Trips 246P/156 ‘0008’ in the 1960 Monza paddock. Note how much different the rear bodywork is compared with its 246P Monaco spec. (Archie Smith)

grid

Phil Hill’s winning Ferrari Dino 246/60 ‘0007’ # 20 is pushed onto the 1960 Monza grid ahead of von Trips Ferrari Dino 246P/156 ‘0008’. (Archie Smith)

von trips

Taffy von Trips ready for the off, Monza 1960. Ferrari Dino 346P/156. (Archie Smith)

VI Gran Premio di Modena F2 1960…

The final race appearance for the ‘0008’ in 1960 was Ferrari’s home event at Modena on 2 October.

In the same way that Ferrari beat the Porsche’s at Solitude in July so it was that Jo Bonnier’s Porsche beat Richie Ginther in the front-engined 156 from Taffy von Trips in the new 246P/156 suffering from fading brakes.

Hans Hermann was 4th and Edgar Barth 5th, both also driving 718/2 Porsche’s.

bonnier

1960 Modena F2 GP. Jo Bonnier’s Porsche 718/2 leads #26 Ginther’s front engined Ferrari Dino 156 from von Trips mid engined 246P/156. (unattributed)

trips

von Trips Ferrari 246P/156 F2, #10 Edgar Barth Porsche 718/2, #28 Hans Hermann Porsche 718/2. Modena GP 1960 grid. (unattributed)

trips 2

Taffy von Trips, Ferrari Dino 246P/156 ‘0008’ F2, Modena GP 1960. (unattributed)

carlo

The brilliant, portly Tuscan engineer and 246P/156 designer Carlo Chiti explains to von Trips how to get the best from his car. Italian GP, Monza 1960. (Archie Smith)

1961 Beckons…

This development work on the new-fangled mid-engined concept was very successful, the 156 the dominant GP car of 1961; it took the Constructors Championship for Ferrari and Drivers title for Phil Hill. But lets not forget the role the 246P/156 ‘0008’ and Chiti’s development skills and prodigious work output made in that remarkable transition from the back to front of the grid in less than 12 months…

ferrari 156 cutaway

Cutaway drawing of the Ferrari 156 F2 car ‘0008’ in 1960 trim. Spaceframe chassis, double wishbone & coil spring/damper suspension front and rear. ‘Tipo 188’ 1.5 litre 65 degree, DOHC, 2 valve 2 triple -choked Weber carbed V6 giving circa 180bhp in 1960 spec. 5 speed gearbox, Dunlop disc brakes. (James Allington)

Etcetera…

front 2

More detail; von Trips Dino 246P/156 Monza 1960.  (Archie Smith)

butt shot

Ferrari Dino 246P/156 butt shot. Monza paddock, Italian GP 1960. Fairing of the chassis with bodywork of this series of cars, and its aero advantage, superb. (Archie Smith)

monza

Willy Mairesse in his 2.5 litre GP Ferrari Dino 246 tows von Trips 1.5 litre F2 Dino 246P/156 to a good time in the little car, Monza banking. Italian GP 1960. (Archie Smith)

ferrari

The boss at Monza to both suss his new car and the opposition. Enzo Ferrari, Monza, 1960, car is Barth’s factory Porsche 718/2 F2. (Archie Smith)

Etcetera The First 246 Test Session…

Here are a series of photos from the Getty Archives of the first test day at Modena in May 1960. Ferrari is present as is Carlo Chiti, the driver in all of these shots is factory test driver Martino Severi. Car is unpainted, perhaps Ginther not present on day #1.

enzo 1

Ferrari, Severi, Chiti (Getty)

enzo 2

246SP lines clear in this shot, front engined styling on a mid-engined car! Ferrari back to camera (Getty)

enzo 3

(Getty)

enzo 4

Hand formed aluminium panels of the prototype clear as are Borrani ‘knock-ons’ and Dunlop disc brakes (Getty)

enzo 5

The boss looks on and contemplates this big change in the design of his cars, the Scuderia got the hang of it quickly enough! (Getty)

Check out this brief article i wrote about the Ferrari 156 a while back…

https://primotipo.com/2014/12/21/ferrari-156-duet-ricardo-and-phil-spa-1962/

Also see this article on Giancarlo Baghetti which covers the 1961 record of both him and 156 ‘0008’ in 1961…

https://primotipo.com/2015/05/08/giancarlo-baghetti-lotus-49-ford-italian-grand-prix-1967/

Some great Monaco 1960 Race Footage…

Photo Credits…

George Phillips, Dave Friedman Collection, Archie Smith, Getty Images

Bibliography…

F1 Technical, F2 Register, 8W.forix.com, James Allington cutaway drawing, barchetta.cc, Doug Nye ‘History of the GP Car 1965-85’

Tailpiece: Lets Leave Monaco by Train as we Arrived…

train

(Dave Friedman Collection)

Finito…